Raul Labrador

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Update 10:34 a.m. Thursday: Former Republican Lt. Governor David Leroy has filed paperwork to run for Labrador's seat. He is the first candidate to enter the race.

Earlier this week Republican Rep. Raul Labrador filed paperwork to run for Idaho governor, ending a long period of speculation about whether he would jump into the race. Now, political wonks are turning their attention to who might seek his congressional seat. 

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

After months of speculation, U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador walked into the Idaho Secretary of State's office Tuesday morning and signed the paperwork to start his run for governor.

Otto Kitsinger / AP

U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador says his answer to a question on health care at a recent town hall in northern Idaho wasn't very elegant.

Labrador has received criticism for his comment Friday that no one has died because they didn't have access to health care — a claim disputed by medical experts because they counter that patients without health coverage often risk waiting until their conditions have advanced too far for effective treatment.

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It was another marathon session for Congressman Raul Labrador at his second town hall event in a week. The Idaho Republican took questions for over two and a half hours.

Labrador’s event Monday night in Nampa at Mission Aviation Fellowship was smaller than the first one held in Meridian. Around 350 people filled a meeting room at MAF as opposed to the almost thousand constituents that filled an auditorium April 19.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

A combative and sometimes angry crowd challenged Republican Rep. Raul Labrador during his town hall Wednesday night.

Labrador answered questions about everything from Planned Parenthood to public lands. At one point, he was asked whether he believes health care is a human right, to which the crowd responded with loud boos.  

“So no I do not believe that health care is a basic right," says Labrador. "When something is a right it’s something that must be provided by the government.”

Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

As many politicians have retreated from facing constituents in person at town hall meetings over the last few months, Idaho's Raul Labrador is bucking the trend by scheduling two town halls later this month.

The first public event the Republican congressman will hold is Wednesday, April 19. The event begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Meridian Middle School Auditorium. Labrador's second town hall will be held at Mission Aviation Fellowship in Nampa on April 24; it also starts in the evening at 6:30.

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Idaho’s legislative delegation in Washington, D.C. is weighing in on Thursday’s missile strikes against a Syrian airfield. The pinpoint military action used 59 cruise missiles to blast an airfield in Syria said to be the site where planes carrying chemical weapons were based.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

U.S. Representative Raul Labrador spoke to the Idaho House Wednesday about President Donald Trump.

The First District Republican gave a fifteen minute speech to members of Idaho’s House of Representatives. Labrador said he was concerned at the reaction to President Trump’s actions. Labrador said people are acting like Trump’s actions are unusual or illegitimate, when he’s just doing the things he said he would while campaigning.

Karl Stanton / Flickr Creative Commons

With backlashes at townhall meetings held by congressional representatives across the country, Idaho’s own Congressional delegation isn’t setting any public meetings with constituents during the current recess.

There’s a missing persons campaign afoot for Idaho’s D.C. contingent.

Posters announcing a mock missing persons campaign for Idaho’s D.C. contingent are making the rounds on social media and on street lights in downtown Boise. The posters say: “Missing: Have You Seen This Man?” and feature pictures of Senator Mike Crapo or Senator Jim Risch.

Richard Drew / AP Images

According to the Washington Post, Rep. Ryan Zinke (R-MT) has been tapped to lead the Interior Department under Donald Trump. The cabinet position oversees key agencies pertinent to life in the West, including the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Republican U.S. Rep. Raul Labrador has contributed to more than 40 GOP candidates running in legislative races across Idaho, as well as giving $10,000 to the Idaho Republican Party.

Labrador mostly gave $250 and $500 campaign donations to Republican legislative candidates facing Democratic or third-party challengers, including races outside of his 1st Congressional District.

James Piotrowski for Congress / YouTube

Both candidates vying for Idaho's First Congressional District launched new TV ads in the last week.

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Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Northwest Nazarene University Political Scientist Steve Shaw is among those captivated by the presidential race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. But he thinks their campaign will have little, if any, effect on races for Senate, the U.S. House, the state Supreme Court or a constitutional amendment in Idaho.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Images

Republican Congressman Raul Labrador (R-Idaho) has launched a new TV campaign commercial.

The 30-second TV spot begins with the story of Labrador being raised by a single mother. He says his mom – who held two or three jobs at times – taught him the value of public service.

House Approps GOP YouTube

Congressman Mike Simpson had some pointed things to say about public lands during a recent budget hearing on Capitol Hill with U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell.

“Let me tell you why people live in Idaho," Simpson said. "They live in Idaho because they love their public lands. They like access to them for recreation, for hunting, for fishing, for all the activities that they do on public lands."

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