Recreation

A federal fisheries management panel has approved what some charter captains are calling the best ocean fishing season in 20 years.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

If you've hiked around Boise's foothills, you've likely come across a pile or two of dog poop. In February, there were 104 piles of waste at the Table Rock trailhead. Data show (yes, it's being tracked) those piles fluctuate from year to year, but the problem persists.

trapping, wildlife
Jessica Murri / For Boise State Public Radio

Just four years ago, bobcat fur sold for about $200. Now, that same bobcat pelt can be sold for almost $2,000. Higher prices come from a rise in demand for fur in Asia, and it has led to more trappers in the field here in Idaho.

Patrick Carney, president of the Idaho Trappers Association, gets calls almost daily from folks who want advice on how to get into commercial trapping.

Cascade Raft and Kayak

The stretch of rain and snow across much of Idaho in the last few weeks has transformed what looked to be a terrible water year into a pretty good one. It’s not just farmers who are breathing easier now. Many in Idaho’s tourism industry, like whitewater rafting companies, rely on snowpack and stream flows as well.

Casey Greene / Adventure Cycling Association

Soaking in an Idaho hot springs may be the perfect way to wrap up a challenging mountain bike ride. The Adventure Cycling Association has combined the two activities into one, with the “Idaho Hot Springs Mountain Bike Route.” It’s a two-map set that takes bikers through 518 miles and 50 hot springs in central Idaho.

Bogus Basin, ski
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Next year’s Bogus Basin season passes went on sale this week. For skiers who buy before Monday, $229 will get them unlimited access to the ski mountain next season. Alan Moore, executive director of the non-profit attraction north of Boise, says prices are staying at the same level as this year.

The 2013-2014 season has been mixed, Moore says. Like many ski hills in Idaho, Bogus had pretty thin snow for a while.  But Moore says it’s also had a lot of sunny days that have drawn people out of the often hazy valley.  

Jessica Murri / For Boise State Public Radio

Almost every day since the end of January, the Boise Foothills Trail Conditions Facebook page has warned hikers of the same thing: trails are muddy. Those conditions have forced would-be hikers to find recreation alternatives.

Pine Irwin is part of a group that uses Boise parks and the Greenbelt instead of hiking in the foothills.  Irwin and her dogs joined others in Veterans Memorial Park Sunday morning because, she says, using the foothills right now is not an option.

Idaho 'Bucket List' Readers Add 35 More Must-Dos To The List

Jan 21, 2014
mesa falls, water, idaho
Pete Char / Flickr Creative Commons

Of the hundreds of comments we've received on the Idaho Bucket List we published last week, two things are abundantly clear: Idahoans are passionate about their state, and 75 simply isn't enough to create a complete bucket list.

In all honesty, we knew both of those things going into the project.

Henry's Fork, Island Park, scenic, Idaho
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho's nearly 84,000 square miles of breathtaking views, rugged terrain, and unique landmarks mean the Gem State is rife with recreation and site-seeing options. It could take a lifetime to see it all. In the spirit of the new year, we've compiled a list of the 75 things you must experience in Idaho -- at least once.

Consider this list a starting place for your own Idaho bucket list. By no means is this a definitive list. Send us more Idaho must-dos using the hashtag #IDbucketlist.

75. Bike the Hiawatha Trail.

Steve Stuebner

The Owyhee Canyonlands cover more than 5 million acres of rugged landscape in southern Idaho and eastern Oregon.

Few hikers and campers venture into this desert wilderness because there aren't many trail signs or information.

Steve Stuebner teamed up with photographer Mark Lisk to create a guidebook for the Canyonlands. Their new book, The Owyhee Canyonlands: An Outdoor Adventure Guide, details 55 hiking and biking trails.

yellowstone, winter, bison, snowcoach
Yellowstone NPS / Flickr Creative Commons

Yellowstone National Park is reopening for the winter.

Starting Sunday, the north, west and south entrances to the park will be open commercially guided snowmobiles and snowcoaches.

The Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel, dining room and gift shop will open for the season on Dec. 20 and the park's east entrance over Sylvan Pass is set to open Dec. 22.

Yellowstone National Park, Bison, Lamar Valley
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Yellowstone officials say they have seen increased traffic this summer at most entrances at the national park.

The Casper Star-Tribune reports that in August, the number of recreational visits to the park surpassed 2.5 million, with more than 2 million visitors to the park during the three summer months.

Yellowstone has recorded nearly 2.6 million recreational visits so far this year, and the total number of vehicles was up 4.37 percent from the same time period in 2012.

Steve Dondero

Warm Springs Creek is a clean and beautiful tributary of the Big Wood River in Blaine County. The creek is also a great spot for fly-fishing.

Well...normally.

But after the 174-square-mile Beaver Creek Fire was officially contained last week, heavy rain and thunderstorms moved through. That storm and the continued rain that followed brought mud, ash and debris down the mountain – and into Warm Springs Creek and the Big Wood River.

Sadie Babits / Boise State Public Radio

After years of running the grueling half marathon at Robie Creek, Bart Davis had an idea. Instead of just running the 13.1 miles up and down the steep Aldape Peak summit, why not turn around and do it all over again?

Davis’ company, Rivertown Racing, came up with its own brand new race: the Double Robie on September 28. The race will be a full marathon – beginning and ending at Fort Boise. Runners will climb 3,800 feet over 26.2 miles.

Officials in Ketchum say private supporters of a proposed whitewater park will pay for an environmental assessment on a possible transfer of federal land. That land is needed before the project can move forward. 

Ketchum Parks and Recreation Department Director Jennifer Smith told city councilors last week that the U.S. Bureau of Land Management has listed the city's land transfer request as a low priority. Because of budget restraints, the agency won't complete a review in less than three years.

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