Refugees

Mark Lennihan / AP

The 34th annual Frank Church Conference on Public Affairs comes to Boise State Monday, October 24. Through the years, the Frank Church Institute has hosted a former U.S. president, vice presidents, cabinet secretaries and a long list of international scholars.

TheKarenD / Flickr

In North Idaho, incendiary flyers are being distributed anonymously. Authorities in Bonner County say they’re reviewing the materials.

Vsevolod Georgobiani / Flickr

Evidence has come to light indicating Russia was behind an anti-immigrant protest set to take place last summer in Twin Falls. The revelation comes as more proof the hostile foreign power tried to shape events in the run-up to last year’s election.


Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

A conservation group will work with refugees to protect a wetland area owned by the City of Boise.

College of Southern Idaho / Facebook

Part of the Trump Administration’s travel ban upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court has put a 120 day freeze on admitting refugees to the country. In spite of the ban, a refugee center in the Magic Valley doesn’t anticipate much impact.

Unlike the blanket ban on refugees announced in January, the revised one upheld in a June 26 Supreme Court ruling allows some refugees who have a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States” to enter the country.

City of Twin Falls

In a 5-to-2 vote Monday, the Twin Falls City Council decided to label the community a “Neighborly City.”

In the run-up to the decision, the city council heard more than three hours of public comment at meetings over the last month.

The “Neighborly City” label is a tamer version of declarations other cities have made calling themselves either “Welcoming” or “Sanctuary Cities” where federal immigration law is either downplayed or outright flouted.

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

This week the Trump administration revised its earlier executive order and is banning residents from six foreign nations from entering the United States. But the new order also extends provisions of the first executive order, which caps the number of refugees allowed into the U.S. 

The executive order outlines a steep reduction in the number of refugees admitted this fiscal year. President Trump’s cap of 50,000 refugees is less than half of the 110,000 allowed under former President Obama. The order also calls for a suspension of all refugees for 120 days.

Courtesy: Hy Kloc

An Idaho Democratic lawmaker's resolution honoring immigrants and refugees faced opposition from a legislative panel after Republican members questioned the timeliness of such praise.

Rep. Hy Kloc, of Boise, says his resolution introduced Thursday is intended to recognize the ongoing contributions of immigrants and refugees in Idaho.

Kloc, who was born in a refugee camp in Germany and whose parents were Holocaust survivors, said he came to the United States as a refugee in 1949. Last year, he backed a resolution honoring the 130th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty.

Interfaith Equality Coalition / Facebook

Nearly 30 Idaho clergy and faith representatives filled Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter's office on Wednesday urging the Republican to welcome all refugees and not just give preference to persecuted Christians.

Otter recently announced that Christian refugees should be treated as a priority in the U.S. refugee program and then acknowledged his stance was discriminatory. Otter has since backed away from that claim, but his remarks have sparked alarm among the state's faith leaders.

Domestic terrorism has taken many forms since the horrific events of September 11th. From these disparate acts, a sinister pattern of domestic terrorism has emerged as American Muslim men and women are radicalized from afar by extremist groups like ISIS.

Peter Bergen, is an internationally recognized expert on terrorism, a documentary producer and CNN’s national security analyst. In his latest book, titled United States of Jihad, Mr. Bergen discusses the social and political influences that can transform average Muslim Americans into homegrown terrorists.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter says he chose the wrong word in his recent remarks acknowledging his preference that Christian refugees should be treated as a priority.

Otter, speaking at an Idaho Press Club event Tuesday, said he believes in religious preference, not religious discrimination. When pressed on the difference between the two, Otter said the United States has an obligation to protect groups being targeted for discrimination.

 

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

The Boise City Council has voted unanimously to adopt a resolution affirming the city's role as a welcoming community and a community of refuge.

The Idaho Statesman reports the resolution passed Tuesday declares "the City of Boise is committed to being a Welcoming City and creating a community where all of our residents feel welcomed, safe and able to fully participate in, and contribute to, our city's economic and social life."

Darin Oswald / Idaho Statesman

Social media requests to flood the phone lines of Idaho’s congressional delegation seem to be working. Over the weekend, the voicemail inboxes of Idaho Sen. Jim Risch and Sen. Mike Crapo were full.

According to Crapo communications director Lindsay Nothern, the Boise office was fielding calls from Idahoans all Monday morning. Nothern says he personally took dozens of calls.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

More than 600 people held signs, chanted and demonstrated yesterday at the Boise Airport in opposition to President Donald Trump’s executive order banning refugees from entering the country.

“No hate. No Fear. Refugees are welcome here!” resounded through the concourse between the airport’s check-in counters and security area.

Laura Gilmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Several Boise State students will compete in an international contest, with the chance to win $1 million. The student teams were chosen out of more than 50,000, and their projects seek to help refugees.

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