Shakespeare

Idaho Shakespeare Festival

Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s production of Hamlet, its first in more than a decade, continues at its amphitheater south of Boise through the month of June. The production, directed by ISF’s artistic producing director Charlie Fee, features an Elizabethan set design and on-stage seating for the audience.

But the real talk of the town surrounds the casting of Hamlet. Alternating in the lead role are Laura Welsh Berg and Jonathan Dyrud. And when they’re not playing Hamlet, the actors are also alternating in the supporting role of Rosencrantz.

Marcel Pacatte / Boise State Public Radio

The first collection of Shakespeare's plays, printed nearly 400 years ago, is in Boise for three more weeks, and on Thursday night the world's foremost Shakespeare scholar delivered the keynote speech of the celebration surrounding the famed First Folio's stop here.

Today, we revere them. So much so, in fact, that they're worth millions. One was purchased for just under $6 million, another for just over. Some are secured in vaults. One had to be sold because its owner couldn't afford the insurance.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

 

A rare copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio is in Boise for a month-long exhibition at Boise State University. This 400-year-old book is the first collection of William Shakespeare’s plays. It has immense historical significance and is sought-after by collectors. Copies can sell for millions of dollars. Boise State has gone to great lengths to create a memorable experience and ensure the book’s safety.

Wiki Media Commons

A valuable, rare book is coming to Idaho for a month-long exhibition at Boise State University. The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. is doing a national tour of the first collection of William Shakespeare’s plays, known as the First Folio. The university expects thousands of people to come and see this 400-year-old book.

To explain why this book is considered so important, George Prentice talked with reporter and the KBSX newsroom’s resident Shakespeare enthusiast Adam Cotterell.