Snow

Snow Comes Early To Bogus Basin, But No Early Opening Yet

Oct 22, 2012
Bogus Basin Recreation Area

Bogus Basin Recreation Area received about three inches of snow today, giving skiers in the Treasure Valley something to talk about.

Will Idaho See More Or Less Rain And Snow This Winter?

Oct 22, 2012
Ron Abramovich / National Resources Conservation Service

Recent rain has provided some much-needed relief from the dry conditions Idaho has experienced this year.

According to water supply specialist Ron Abramovich, the rain has gone a long way in ending the wildfire season.

“What it did was put a damper on the fire season finally," says Abramovich, who monitors water levels for the National Resources Conservation Service in Boise. "Too bad it didn’t come in September because it would have helped out a lot more then.”

Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Weather forecasters say the current dry spell in the Northwest may turn into a dry winter. But the region’s ski areas aren’t buying it.

John Livingston is the chief meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Spokane. He says the key to the Northwest’s winter lies in ocean surface temperatures between South America and Indonesia. That’s where patterns are developing that seem to point to a warmer “El Nino” year. “It probably means maybe less snow that we would normally expect in the mountains and then definitely less snow in the valleys with the warmer temperatures.”

Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

The Pacific Northwest, including most of Idaho, should have a decent whitewater season this year.   Ample snowpacks in the mountains mean good river flows through the summer.  Kayakers and rafters in Idaho north of the Snake River should benefit.

Spring Weather Makes For Tricky River Management

May 9, 2012
Sadie Babits / Boise State Public Radio

Warmer temperatures this week have kept river levels high in Idaho as mountain snow melts. It’s been a challenging year for those who manage the state’s river systems. That’s because the spring runoff happened a month earlier than last year. It's brought flooding along the Boise River and raises questions about water availability next year. Just ask Ron Abramovich. He's a hydrologist and water supply specialist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Boise. 

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Hydrologists from the Natural Resources Conservation Service call the latest snow survey results "March Madness in Idaho."  Storm after storm hit the state in March, marking one of the greatest one-month changes in snowpack on record. 

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