Sugar Beets

Joe Jaszewski / Idaho Statesman

Lots of winter snow followed by abnormally wet spring weather delayed spring field work in the Treasure and Magic Valleys. But the Capital Press reports farm work is back on schedule now that weather has returned to normal and temperatures are on the rise.

Paul Skeen of the Malhuer County Onion Growers says he planted most of his crop two to three weeks later than usual. 

But recent warm days are causing crops like sugar beets and corn to come on strong. And farmers are counting on continued warm weather to bring crops back to normal.

Julie Falk / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been a frustrating spring for southwest Idaho farmers. Abnormal weather has been causing problems and delaying planting for many of those who grow sugar beets, onions and other crops.

Canyon County Extension agent Jerry Neufeld says the constant spring rain has really slowed the process down. Farmers who normally have all their spring planting done by now are seeing their workload start to backup.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Federal health officials recently updated the nation’s dietary guidelines. The cattle industry was able to relax a bit after learning the recommendations didn’t include specifics on cutting back on red meat. But the guidelines – which are updated every five years – did point a finger at sugar. Hwoever, not everyone agrees with the those new limits.