Tamarack Resort

Tamarack Resort
A.Davey / Flickr Creative Commons

A homeowners association has purchased parts of the long-troubled Tamarack Resort near Donnelly, Idaho.

The Tamarack Municipal Association purchased the property from the bank group Newtrac, and will now control all skiing operations. The golf course and other parts of the resort are still owned by other entities.

Tamarack opened in 2004, but the original owners went bankrupt a few years later and the resort has struggled ever since.

Bogus Basin, ski
Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

As part of a new pricing structure for Bogus Basin Ski Resort, managers recently announced new partnerships with Tamarack and Soldier Mountain. Starting next winter Bogus season pass owners will get some time at Tamarack and vice versa.

Bogus Basin's Plan To Keep The Mountain White

Dec 18, 2015
Jessica Murri

It’s a cold morning at Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area without a single cloud in the sky, but that doesn’t keep snow from piling up on the slopes. That’s thanks to a brand new SMI Super Polecat snow gun, blowing thousands of gallons of water into the freezing air.

“Since November First, we have used 800,000 gallons of water through the snowguns . . . so that’s enough to cover one acre of ground with a foot of snow,” says Director of Mountain Operations at Bogus Basin, Nate Shake.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

State officials approved a lease for Tamarack Resort's ski area in about as long as it takes an expert skier to go from the top of the mountain to the bottom.

The five members of the Idaho Land Board voted unanimously at a special session Thursday to transfer the 2,100-acre lease to a company called New TRAC.

New TRAC acquired the lease following a sheriff's bankruptcy sale in March.

The lease costs about $278,000 annually, far more than the $80,000 the land would generate if it reverted to timber harvest.

tamarack, donnelly, resort
A.Davey / Flickr Creative Commons

Tamarack Resort could take a significant step toward a clearer financial picture Thursday when Idaho officials decide whether to transfer a ski area lease to a new company that emerged after a sheriff's bankruptcy sale last spring.

But first a majority of the five-member Idaho Land Board will have to be persuaded at the special meeting that Tamarack can afford about $278,000 annually to use the 2,100 acres of state-owned land the ski area is built on.

The lease represents one of the state's more lucrative deals.

Tamarack Resort
A.Davey / Flickr Creative Commons

The Idaho man who once tried to take control of the cash-strapped Tamarack Resort has been ordered to spend more than 17 years in prison for raiding pension funds to help finance the deal.

The sentence was handed down Wednesday for Matthew Hutcheson, who starting in 2010 went public with his intentions to buy the struggling ski resort outside Donnelly.

But the deal never materialized. In April, the Eagle man was convicted of 17 counts of wire fraud as part of a scheme to steal $5 million from pension funds he was trusted to oversee.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

The real estate crash triggered some big bankruptcies in the Northwest, but few are as spectacular and convoluted as the foreclosure of the unfinished Tamarack Resort in western Idaho.  The
resort remains in extended legal limbo, but plucky homeowners are keeping it alive until a new buyer arrives.


A foreclosure auction on the courthouse steps is an outcome most people want to avoid.  But in the case of Idaho's Tamarack Resort, the surrounding community and visitors are now itching for a sheriff's sale.  That's because they want a fresh start with a new owner.

DONNELLY, Idaho - The real estate crash triggered some big bankruptcies in the Northwest, but few are as spectacular and convoluted as the foreclosure of the unfinished Tamarack Resort in western Idaho. What was supposed to be the Northwest's newest destination resort remains in extended legal limbo, but plucky homeowners are keeping it alive until a new buyer arrives.

tamarackidaho.com

An Idaho judge has ruled that would-be Tamarack Resort buyer Matthew Hutcheson can no longer oversee retirement funds. U.S. District Judge Edward Lodge Wednesday issued an injunction against the Eagle businessman who bid $40 million  for the bankrupt ski resort in 2010.

Hutcheson is accused of wire fraud and theft for allegedly taking more than $ 2 million from pension funds he oversaw. In the order, Lodge writes that Hutcheson could cause further injury to the pensions if he is allowed to manage them while his case plays out.