Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Treasure Valley’s bus system serves more than one million passengers every year. But with the region’s population growing rapidly, transit planners want to quadruple the system in the next 20 years.

AP Photo

Thursday, the Idaho Senate passed Governor Butch Otter’s massive tax cut bill on a vote of 26-9. It had already passed the House and now just needs Otter's signature to become law. The bill cut taxes for some in Idaho and creates a $130 dollar child tax credit.

Idaho Press-Tribune via Idaho State Police via AP

As state lawmakers sift through the nearly 400 bills introduced this session, two of them have been moving quickly, but quietly, through the chambers.

Troy Maben / AP Photo

More than 400 bills are working their way through the Idaho Legislature in what has been a very busy week for lawmakers.

stefan klocek / Flickr

Week five of the Idaho Legislature saw a lot of action in committees and on the House Floor. Big ticket issues were addressed, including a combination tax cut and tax conformity bill.


Calling it the largest tax reduction in Idaho history, a bill to cut taxes by $200 million dollars passed a House committee Monday. This is the first step for the bill as it works its way through the Idaho Legislature.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

The heads of every public college and university in Idaho have sent a letter to the state’s legislative delegation in Washington D.C. The educators are united in their opposition to the tax bill being hashed out by congressional Republicans.

Nancy Harris

Before the Thanksgiving break, the GOP-controlled Senate is trying to get as much done on their tax proposal as possible. At the same time, a group opposed to the plan in Idaho has found a way to incorporate the holiday into their protest. 

arsheffield / Flickr

Republicans are out with their much-anticipated tax plan. The GOP proposal is the biggest overhaul of the tax system in a generation. While the plan maintains some popular provisions, it changes several others.

Tim / Flickr

If you’re renting out a room in your house or a camping spot in your backyard, you have to pay taxes on that.

Jesse L. Bonner / AP Images

Tuesday, the Idaho Supreme Court ruled in favor of Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter’s decision to veto a grocery tax repeal passed by the legislature this spring.

To recap: After the legislative session adjourned, the governor vetoed a bill written to get rid of the grocery tax. In response, a group of lawmakers filed suit against that veto – arguing the governor had made his veto decision too late – after the legal timeframe allowed. But now the court has agreed with the governor, and his veto stands.

Rebecca Boone / AP Images

The Idaho Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Thursday over a controversial veto by Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter.

The Idaho Legislature passed a repeal of the grocery tax earlier this year, a 6 percent tax that most states do not impose. The measure gained bipartisan support and passed the Senate and House in March.

Gregory Williams / Flickr Creative Commons

Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter allowed a transportation funding bill to become law Tuesday, despite concerns over how the plan came to be.

The $320 million transportation plan takes about $15 million out of the general fund through sales tax – which is used to pay for things like public schools. Governor Otter is not happy with this funding formula, but with bridges and roads falling apart across the state he allowed the bill to become law – without his signature.

Seth Perlman / Associated Press

If you’re e-filing your taxes as next week’s deadline looms, and your return is rejected, you may be the victim of identity theft. The Idaho Tax Commission has already seen cases of fraudulent returns.

Since January, the Idaho Tax Commission has prevented the theft of close to $300,000 in Idaho refunds that were targeted by criminals.

Tawnya Eldredge is the Commission’s identity theft assistance coordinator.

Charlie Litchfield / AP

The Idaho Legislature closed up shop and went home Wednesday. The session went five days longer than leadership had anticipated.

The session was notable for a few bills, including transportation funding and tax cuts, which were sticking points at the end of the session. Lawmakers also didn’t find a solution for the 78,000 Idahoans who fall in the Medicaid gap and don’t have health insurance.