U.S. Supreme Court

Butch Otter
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter says the U.S. Supreme Court should wait until it receives arguments from Idaho before deciding a case involving gay marriage in the United States.

In documents filed with the nation's highest court, lawyers for Otter said waiting for Idaho's case would help the Supreme Court resolve "the marriage-litigation wave in all respects."

David / Flickr Creative Commons

A reporter for the blog covering the Supreme Court, "Scotusblog" says the state of Idaho likely faces an uphill battle in convincing justices that their case against gay marriage is any different than the seven states the court turned away Monday.

wedding rings
MyTudut / Flickr Creative Commons

This story was updated at 5:45 p.m.

State bans on same-sex marriages have been falling around the country since summer 2013, when the Supreme Court ordered the federal government to recognize state-sanctioned gay marriages. The high court Monday cleared the way for more expansion by turning away appeals from five states seeking to prohibit it.  

Abortion services providers say the Supreme Court’s ruling on 35-foot “buffer zones” around Massachusetts clinics won’t have much effect in the Northwest.

Shawn / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia will visit Boise in August to give the keynote speech at a conference marking the end of a nearly 30-year water adjudication process.

The University of Idaho announced the upcoming event is sponsored by the Idaho Supreme Court, the Kempthorne Institute, and U of I’s College of Law.

Scalia is speaking at a conference celebrating the end of the Snake River Basin Adjudication process which negotiated water rights in Idaho. That adjudication started in 1987.

The issue of whether gay marriage is legal in Oregon may not be settled after all.

The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to begin its new term Monday – despite the federal government shutdown. The new round of legal cases will likely continue a pattern of closely divided rulings.

It's still not clear what the Supreme Court's ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act will mean for many same-sex couples in the Northwest. That's because of new legal questions surrounding the hundreds of couples who have marriage licenses from Washington state but live in states like Idaho and Oregon that have banned same-sex marriage.

Franz Jantzen / U.S. Supreme Court Website

Law experts in Idaho say today’s decisions from the Supreme Court that strike down the Defense of Marriage Act and allow gay marriage to resume in California will have no effect on Idaho law.

Gay couples do not have the right to marry in Idaho.  Idaho passed a constitutional amendment in 2006 that says the only marriage the state will recognize is between a man and woman. 

Courtesy of the Idaho Press Club

Allen Derr, an Idaho lawyer who won a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling to bolster anti-discrimination protections for women, died Monday in Boise. He was 85.

On Nov. 22, 1971, the Supreme Court justices issued their Reed vs. Reed decision, holding states cannot discriminate against people because of their gender. It marked a departure from the era when courts often excluded women from full participation in important civil affairs.

The Supreme Court today decided in favor of the timber industry in a case about the regulation of muddy waters that flow off logging roads.  In a surprising move, one of the court’s conservative justices dissented, and sided with the environmentalists.

Environmental groups in Oregon filed the case.

They argued that muddy water flowing from ditches into forest streams, harms fish, and should be considered industrial pollution.

In a 7-1 decision the Court said it would defer to the Environmental Protection Agency’s read of the law.

Aaron Kunz / EarthFix

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Monday makes it harder for miners to gain access to Northwest rivers. Environmental groups hailed the decision as a major victory.

Supreme Court: EPA Rule Could Make Logging Road Case Moot

Dec 4, 2012
Amelia Templeton

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Monday in a case from Oregon over water pollution from logging roads. But a last minute rule change may have made the case moot.

Attorneys involved in the case say that at 5 pm last Friday, the Environmental Protection Agency issued a new rule trying to clarify that the runoff from logging roads should not be considered industrial pollution. 

Supreme Court Rejects ‘Roadless Rule’ Appeal

Oct 1, 2012

The U.S. Supreme Court will not hear an appeal to the so-called Roadless Rule. The law bans development on nearly 60,000,000 acres of national forest land.

Since its enactment in early 2001, the Roadless Rule has drawn fire from Western states and industry groups -- most recently the state of Wyoming and the Colorado Mining Association.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

The U-S Supreme Court’s decision to uphold universal health care has triggered a lot of reaction from politicians and analysts.  Idaho was one of the first states to join the lawsuit to strike down the law.  

Ted Epperly has been involved in the debate over health care, testifying before Congress and speaking across the country about the need for reform measures.  The Boise-based family physician served as the President of the American Academy of Family Physicians and met with President Obama six times to offer his views about health care. 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

In a 5-4 majority, the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld most of  the federal health care law, including one of the more controversial measures, the individual mandate

Emilie Ritter Saunders / StateImpact Idaho

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the majority of President Barack Obama's health care law.  

The high court issued its ruling in Washington this morning.  You can read the ruling here.

Now, Idaho lawmakers and policy makers are weighing in. 

Here's what some of them are saying:

Update at 2:30 pm MST

Senator Crapo's Office

The U.S. Supreme Court will make a much anticipated decision this week on the nation’s health care law.  Idaho's senior senator believes some parts of the law will survive whatever the court decides. 

Senator Crapo's Office

The U.S. Supreme Court decided Monday to reject a Montana law that bans direct corporate spending on state political campaigns. 

U.S.  Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID) said Tuesday the Court’s decision dealt a blow to state sovereignty.  "I believe it should have gone the other way and it should have supported the state of Montana."

Montana’s one hundred-year old law conflicts with a U.S. Supreme Court decision called Citizen’s United that allows unlimited corporate spending in federal campaigns. 

en.wikipedia.org

The United States Supreme Court Monday rejected Montana’s challenge to Citizen’s United, the decision that removed limits on corporate spending in political campaigns. Montana argued its state laws gave it the right to limit political spending. Idaho was one of several states that filed friend of the court briefs to support its neighbor’s position. Bob Cooper with the Idaho Attorney General’s office says the AG was not speaking against Citizen’s United, simply supporting states’ rights.

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