Voter Fraud

Lawerence Denney
Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Secretary of State Lawerence Denney isn’t holding back after the state's Democratic Party say he backed down from a request by the Trump Administration's voter fraud commission due to a lawsuit they filed.

AP

Tuesday, President Trump's committee tasked with looking into allegations of voter fraud held its first public meeting. The commission was formed to address Trump’s belief that rampant voter fraud took place in the 2016 election. So far, no evidence has been presented to support the claim.

On July 3, the commission requested all 50 states provide sensitive voter information. After much push back from Idaho voters and legal pressure from the Idaho Democratic Party, Secretary of State Lawerence Denney decided he would not comply with the commission's request.

IIP Photo Archive / Flickr

Idaho officials say they’ll hold off on providing detailed voter information to the President’s commission looking into alleged voter fraud. States across the nation are now being told to pause.

On Monday, Vice President Mike Pence’s office sent out an email to states saying they should wait before sending the detailed information requested by the Trump Administration’s Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. Pence leads the commission along with Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

Lawrence Wasden
Idaho Public Television

Attorney General Lawrence Wasden's office says it will not file criminal charges after being asked to review possible voter intimidation and interference in northern Idaho.

Deputy Attorney General Paul Panther sent a letter earlier this week alerting the Bonner County prosecutor's office that he did not find evidence of malicious harassment or stalking.

In the season of the 2016 general election, we’re discussing the history of voting rights on today’s show with, Michael Waldman. He is the president of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU’s School of Law, and the author of a new book, titled The Fight To Vote.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

This election day, the U.S. Department of Justice will have federal attorneys in every state, ready to take complaints. It's a long-standing program aimed at combating election fraud and voter rights abuses. But the hotlines tend to be pretty quiet in the Northwest.

The election day program has been around for decades. But attorneys in Oregon and eastern Washington say -– at least in recent memory -– they haven't gotten any complaints. Western Washington received a few calls in 2008 about voter registration issues.