Voting

vote, election
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Democrats are demanding the state cut ties to a program intended to stamp out voter fraud.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise School District says it needs renovations to its schools and is asking voters to approve a $172 million bond to pay for it all. In Meridian, voters will consider a new bond for the West Ada School District worth $160 million over 10 years. And the Kuna school district has both a bond and supplemental levy on the ballot for the March 14 election.

Ronda Churchill / AP

Election officials said they faced delays tallying the votes in Idaho's second most populated county because of illegible ballots and technical trouble with a voting machine.

The Idaho Press-Tribune reports that the final votes for Canyon County weren't counted until Wednesday morning. Election day polls closed at 8 p.m. on Tuesday.

Tim Hurst, chief deputy at the Secretary of State's office, says Franklin, Bonner and Nez Perce counties also faced troubles counting ballots.

Boise State Public Radio

Secretary of State Lawerence Denney will be working the polls in northern Idaho during Tuesday's election.

Nez Perce County Clerk Patty Weeks said Monday that she first invited Denney to work the May primary election, but the secretary had another commitment. So the two rescheduled for him to work the general election.

This will be the first election Denney — a former House Speaker in the Idaho Legislature — has spent as a poll worker since taking over the office in 2014.

In the season of the 2016 general election, we’re discussing the history of voting rights on today’s show with, Michael Waldman. He is the president of the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU’s School of Law, and the author of a new book, titled The Fight To Vote.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Ada County elections officials today will test their voting system in advance of next week's big vote.

The test takes ballots with predetermined votes and runs them through the same process they would go through on Election Day to make sure software and equipment are working properly.

The equipment is tested every election, but Ada County Deputy Chief Clerk Phil McGrane says there’s added scrutiny this year after allegations of voter fraud across the country.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Elections officials in one Idaho county have found a delicious new way to get out the vote: by bringing "food truck voting" straight to the people.

OK, so it's not a real food truck. You can't get a meal there.

Molly Messick / Boise State Public Radio

After a U.S. Department of Justice found a Nampa polling place is inaccessible to voters with disabilities, Canyon County officials are working to make sure everyone can get inside to vote.

The Idaho Press Tribune reports that Canyon County Clerk Chris Yamamoto is proposing a second entrance at the Southside Methodist Church after the DOJ found the church's ramp was too steep and lacked handrails.

Andrew Dallos / Flickr Creative Commons

With just 90 days left until the general election, a new candidate has joined the race for president – in a last-minute challenge to Donald Trump. 

Forty-year-old Evan McMullin is a final hope for some conservatives unhappy with the GOP choice for president. The relatively unknown Republican has been a CIA operative, a House GOP adviser and worked for Goldman Sachs.

Kyle Green / Idaho Statesman

People stood for hours Tuesday in a line that snaked around several blocks of downtown Boise for a chance to take part in the Idaho Democratic Caucuses. In Bannock County, party faithfuls stood outside in a snowstorm, waiting for their chance. In many parts of Idaho, the caucus system was overwhelmed by an enthusiastic turnout.

Caucuses across the state were expected to close the doors at 7 p.m. Mountain Time. But the line in downtown Boise had already wrapped around three city blocks an hour before the event was supposed to begin, forcing the delay.

Ada County Statehouse Capitol Building Secretary of State Denney
Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho’s Secretary of State says he won’t put up billboards advertising the state’s Democratic caucus on March 22.

Lawerence Denney came under fire this week from the Idaho Democratic Party, which objects to 22 state-funded billboards that advertise the state’s presidential primary on March 8. The primary is solely for the Republican and Constitution parties, after Democrats chose to hold their event at a later time.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

The Idaho House is set to vote Monday on a bill that would move Idaho’s presidential primary from May to March. Lawmakers are considering the change because of a 2012 event.

In the winter of 2012, all eyes were on the crowded field of Republican presidential candidates. And Idaho’s Republican Party didn’t want to wait until the state-run election in May to let party members weigh in.

Republican voters lined up in school gyms across the state for a party caucus. And it was messy.

elections, voting, vote booth
Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

This story was updated Nov. 21, 2014 

Idaho's voter participation in this year's general election was the lowest ever.

Secretary of State Ben Ysursa tells the Spokesman Review that nearly 37 percent of Idaho's voting-age population cast a ballot Nov. 4.

Ysursa described the results as "abysmal," and urged the need to turn the number around.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

It's Election Day! Maybe you’ve been closely following the races and you know the issues and how you'll cast your ballot. But maybe you don’t actually know how or where or when to vote.

So, here are a few pieces of information to help you out.

Polls are open from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

It’s no secret that young voters are less likely to vote than older voters. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that in every presidential election since 1964, 18-to 24-year-olds voted at lower rates than all other age groups. In the last mid-term election, 21.3 percent of 18-to 24-year-olds voted. The number was almost three times higher for those 65 and over.

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