Idaho StoryCorps: A Collection Of Your Stories

Tune in on Oct. 3 and 6 for a special hour-long show about storytelling featuring the people you've heard in this year's Idaho StoryCorps pieces and how oral histories have changed over the centuries.

The special airs Oct. 3 at 7:00 p.m. MDT and Oct. 6 at 2:00 p.m. MDT on KBSX 91.5. Share your stories with us on Twitter with the #idahostorycorps or on Facebook!

On June 10, 2013 an Airstream trailer parked on the sidewalk outside Boise’s City Hall. It was the mobile recording booth for the national oral history project known as StoryCorps. This mobile studio travels the country collecting people's stories.

The nonprofit organization, StoryCorps, has recorded and archived more than 45,000 personal stories since the oral history project launched in 2003. Excerpts from those recorded interviews are heard each week on NPR's Morning Edition.

We listened to dozens of the interviews recorded in Boise and aired 14 of them on our news station KBSX 91.5 fm.

You can find all 14 of those pieces below.

Since 2003, StoryCorps has given more than 100,000 Americans a quiet

Boise State University

Nearly 300 people stepped into the StoryCorps mobile recording booth to share their stories when it stopped in Boise this summer. Of the 131 interviews that were recorded in that booth, we've aired 14 of them on KBSX 91.5 fm.

StoryCorps

Julie Kreiensieck, 87, will never forget the day she learned her father was a spiritualist. It was around 1939, when the Boise resident learned spiritualists believe they serve as an intermediary between the living and the dead.

Kreiensieck stopped by the StoryCorps booth in Boise to tell her daughter Donna about that day her life changed.

Gary Lane

Every angler has a story about the one that got away. Gary Lane has been fishing in Idaho for a long time and the first story he remembers about a fish, was the one that got away. He tells the story to his friend Greg Stahl.

“My folks took us by horseback into the Eagle Cap Wilderness Area,” said Lane. “I think I might have been in the second or third grade. I caught my first salmon there, a wild salmon. That really hooked me on fishing and the whole outdoor world.”

“Was that a Chinook salmon?” asked Stahl.

“Yeah, a Chinook.”

“Were you fly fishing?”

Clay Morgan

Back in 1985 Idaho's teacher in space Barbara Morgan was at the Johnson Space Center in Texas. She was one of ten finalists for the Teacher in Space program.  Meanwhile, in Idaho, her husband Clay was a smokejumper.  He says a few days before Barbara would learn whether she'd become the first teacher in space, he faced his own survival story. 

Photo courtesy of Paul March

William March Jr. served in the U.S. military for 26 years, and spent two tours in Vietnam.  Later in life he became a circus clown and took his son Paul and the rest of his family around the country performing on the road.  They have a close relationship.  Paul March was thinking about their relationship when he asked his dad about the saddest moment in his life. 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Ever since wolves were re-introduced in Idaho in 1995, they’ve been in the spotlight. No matter where you stand on wolves, their re-introduction remains a story unto itself.

Suzanne Stone remembers the day the first four wolves were released in Idaho. She was there. Stone, who's been an advocate of wolves for 25 years, told her story to Debbie Courson Smith inside the StoryCorps booth in Boise.

Dawn and Don Burke

Boise resident Dawn Burke wasn’t thinking about rats when she went looking for new pet.  “I always thought of rats as dirty, filthy, disease carrying…like, people have them as pets?”   She shared this with her husband Don during a visit to the Idaho Storycorps mobile recording trailer this summer.

Burke did end up with a pet rat and later founded the Rat Retreat, a non-profit sanctuary for abandoned rats. 
 

She says she was shocked to learn her neighbor in Yakima, Washington at the time had pet rats.

Courtesy Lorenzo Family

Amy and David Lorenzo thought they were prepared five years ago when their daughter was born. But they quickly found that perception and reality are two different things when it comes to children. 

The couple sat down in the StoryCorps booth in Boise recently to share their thoughts on parenthood. Amy Lorenzo describes her daughter Morgan as full of energy and love.

StoryCorps

Migrant workers move from place to place to find work. In agriculture, that means going where the crops are. This was true for Estella Ozuna Zamora and her family in the 1950s and 60s. Her parents and her 12 brothers and sisters lived in Texas, but crisscrossed Idaho every year, following the crops.

Inside the mobile StoryCorps booth in Boise, Zamora told her good friend LeAnn Simmons  about what her early life was like.

StoryCorps

When Lisa Sanchez was a child, she lived in Idaho with her mother, who worked at the Simplot Factory in Heyburn. When her grandfather got sick with lung cancer, her mother moved the family to Arizona to help take care of him.  Sanchez said it was her mother who kept the family together after he died.  She told her good friend Donna Vasquez what it was like during that time in a recent visit to the StoryCorps booth in Boise.

Julian Jenkins

This is the time of year for summer camp.  This rite of passage is how many people learn to swim, hike, sing around a campfire and tell ghost stories. Marti Gudmundson remembers singing songs at summer camp, and admiring a handsome, older boy named Nick Molenaar.  Little did either of them know, that decades later, they would meet again and fall in love. They recently shared their love story at the StoryCorps booth in Boise. Gudmundson says it all began in the early 1960s. 

StoryCorps

When wildfire hits the Foothills of the Treasure Valley, everyone who lives there goes on alert.  Three years ago, Nancy Suiter felt that fear when lightning struck the ground near Highway 16. 

A wildfire started in the Eagle foothills and the home Suiter and her husband had built 32 years before was in the path of the flames.  Her daughter Josie Newton took her mother to the StoryCorps booth in Boise to talk about that day.

Charmagne Westcott

Each year, thousands of children are adopted into new families.  When those children grow up, some seek out their biological parents.  That’s what Charmagne Westcott did when she hired a private detective to try and find her birth mother. She sat down in the StoryCorps booth in Boise to remember how she found her biological mother, Sherry Jurd.

Brian Thom and Ardele Hanson

Four years ago, Brian Thom, the Episcopal Bishop of Idaho, came up with a plan to ask Ardele Hanson to marry him.  He wanted to recreate a special moment by kayaking up the Snake River to a lush, green island they had visited that summer. 

In his pocket was an engagement gift, a heart-shaped necklace.  The couple sat down in the StoryCorps booth in Boise to talk about that day.

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