You Ask – We Report

What have you always wondered about Idaho and the region? Boise State Public Radio is launching a news experiment, where we investigate the answers to questions submitted by YOU!

We want you to help shape our stories, before they're even assigned. 

Here's how it works: You submit your questions to us. After we collect questions, we'll let the public vote on the one they want us to answer most. Then, a KBSX reporter will investigate the winning question and we'll play what we find on air and on the web.

We want to know what you want to know.

Specifically: What question do you have about the total solar eclipse in Idaho this August? Submit it below!

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Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

Summer means barbecues, baseball and of course, bathing suits. When temperatures push a hundred degrees, there’s no better way to cool off than by jumping in a pool or pond. But this season, some of the ponds around Boise have dealt with outbreaks of E.coli. As part of our news experiment where we answer questions submitted by you, we went with a summer theme and explored this question from listener Alexi Balmuth: Who monitors harmful bacteria in public swimming areas and how is it done?

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

The Boise Depot is one of those places Boiseans take visitors to show off their town. The early 20th Century Spanish architecture stands out and is a great backdrop for weddings and parties.

But the one thing you haven’t found at the depot for 20 years? Passenger trains.

Colin Falconer has long wondered why that is. Falconer is originally from Seattle and used to take the Amtrak to northern Idaho to swim in lakes with friends when he was a kid. He loved being able to watch the scenery go by, and goof around in the aisles with his buddies.