Travis Powers
Chris Goldberg / Flickr Creative Commons

Amid the bookshelves and paper stacks in the office of All Songs Considered Host Bob Boilen, Boise’s Youth Lagoon delivers an intimate “Tiny Desk Concert” that highlights the project’s new direction.

Since dropping his third album in September, Trevor Powers has gone on to impress with his strong melodic instinct and sense of direction within the songs of Savage Hills Ballroom.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Update Wednesday 12:50 p.m.: Bogus Basin officials have announced plans for a partial opening Friday through the end of the weekend. 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Water experts from around Idaho gathered in Boise earlier this month to brief one another on 2016 forecasts. A slide during a presentation by Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) water supply specialist Ron Abramovich solidified a recurring theme: "think snow."

According to this week's forecast, southern Idaho will be not just thinking snow — but experiencing it.

So how do things look so far when it comes to that precious precipitation?

National Weather Service Boise

The first big winter storm of the season is headed for southern Idaho. The National Weather Service in Boise says a storm is moving in from the Pacific and will bring rain first and then snow.

Josh Smith is a meteorologist in Boise. He says the rain will start Tuesday night in the Treasure Valley. “And then that will be switching to snow probably around 7 or 8 a.m., maybe a little bit later than that, and then we’ll see up to an inch of snow in the Boise Metro area,” Smith says.

Most of the snow will hit Wednesday.

jah / Flickr

The District that keeps irrigation water flowing to Ada and Canyon County has sent out a final warning to 83 people to pay up or face losing their homes.

The Nampa and Meridian Irrigation District (NMID) provides irrigation water to 69,000 acres of farmland, homes and commercial property. Every year, it charges property owners a tax, to pay for upkeep on the canals, laterals, drains and dams in the water system. Many owners don’t realize they owe the tax, even if they don’t use the irrigation water.

The Nature Conservancy

Since Congress let the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) expire in September, conservationists have been trying to get it re-authorized.

Jim Jacobson

Scientists are paying close attention to the ways in which climate change may be impacting wildlife. In Idaho, one of the mammals dealing with the effects of changing conditions are American pikas. 

Pikas are related to rabbits and live in Rocky Mountains states. The curious animals, which have a distinctive call, can be spotted in places like the Sawtooths. They also hang out in the recesses of the Craters of the Moon National Monument.

Well, for now at least.

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

About 700 people turned out at the state capitol in Boise on Saturday to show their support for refugee resettlement. Since the attacks in Paris over a week ago, Governor Butch Otter and Idaho’s congressional delegation have stated their concerns over the vetting process of refugees.

Sean Michael Foster, one of the organizers, thinks the refugee backlash comes down to politics.

Boise GreenBike Faces Fewer Riders During Winter

Nov 20, 2015
Boise Green Bike Rack Grove
Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

This summer was quite successful for the new bike share program in downtown Boise called Boise GreenBike. Riders pedaled more than 27-thousand miles on the bikes, taking more than 10,000 trips. But now that the seasons are changing and temperatures are dropping, the bikes are staying on the racks.

It’s probably no surprise no one wants to ride a bike as much when it’s 40 degrees outside and raining. Out of the 114 bikes in the Boise GreenBike network, only 20 or so are getting a ride each day. That’s according to the director, Dave Fotsch.

Idaho Capitol, statehouse
Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Supporters of refugees in Idaho are holding a rally Saturday, in response to the attacks in Paris and to send a message to state lawmakers.

The group's Facebook page, the Rally For Solidarity With Refugees in Idaho, says it “is simply a meeting for Idahoans to express their solidarity with refugees from Syria and the rest of the world.”

Daniel X. O'Eneil / Flickr

The Boise Bench needs more green spaces and more places for people to gather and connect. Those are two findings in a new study of the area, conducted by Utah State University. Researchers from the university will present their findings Friday at Boise City Hall.

Working with the city, a team from Utah State has been studying the Bench and mapping a future plan for growth.

For the past few months, students from the university have been talking to stakeholders in the area. They’re working on a 30-year plan to make the Bench more of a community.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

It may be the beginning of the end for the homeless tent city near downtown Boise.

Thursday morning residents of the alley known as Cooper Court were awoken by Boise Police officers handing out warnings. The notices listed several laws people were breaking by sleeping in the alley and notified them that they could be fined or jailed.

The tents are located by the Connector in downtown, in an alley off Americana Boulevard and River Street. It's behind the Interfaith Sanctuary homeless shelter.

Courtesy Boise Alternative Shelter Co-op

There are two ideas being talked about in Boise to house chronically homeless people. You can think of them as the Eugene model and the Salt Lake City model.

John Kelly / Boise State University

A Boise State chemistry professor has been named the 2015 Idaho Professor of the Year by two national education organizations.

Susan Shadle is among 35 state winners and the 10th Boise State professor to claim the award, which is handed out by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.

Discovery Center of Idaho

The Discovery Center of Idaho wants more young people to get excited about science, technology, engineering and math – better known as STEM. To do that, the center has partnered with another Boise nonprofit, Giraffe Laugh Early Learning Center. The two groups are asking people in the community to sponsor 50 low-income families with memberships to the science center.

Mecale Causey is with the Discovery Center. She says the idea fits perfectly with their overall mission.

For the last decades of the 20th century, death rates were declining for most Americans. But so far in 21st century Idaho, that's not happening.

Idaho State Historical Society

When you think of Boise, what names come to mind? That’s the question two local historians asked themselves as they wrote a book about Boise's highest profile people.

J.R. Simplot, Julia Davis, Joe Albertson, Curtis Stigers and Kristin Armstrong are just some of those profiled in the new book, “Legendary Locals of Boise.”

Historians Elizabeth Jacox and Barbara Perry Bauer own TAG Historical Research and Consulting. Jacox says their book covers a wide variety of people.

Courtesy of Ann Kennedy / USDA

It’s been called “marching grass” and “the scourge of the West,” but most people refer to it as cheatgrass. The honey-colored weed is named for its ability to “cheat” during the winter, getting ahead of crops and native perennial grasses by taking root while the others are still dormant.

learning elementary student teacher
Alvin Trusty / Flickr Creative Commons

Nearly 10 percent of Idaho children go to school just four days a week. That’s almost 27,000 students. Dozens of districts across the state have switched to four day weeks since the Great Recession in hopes of saving money. But as Idaho Education News reports, nobody knows how that impacts students.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

National forecasters predict an El Nino year. Climate experts say the storms are likely to be as strong as the El Nino 18 years ago, and people in the arid southwest are already dealing with above-average precipitation.

But in Idaho, scientists say the Gem State is in for another hot and dry year.

John Abatzoglou is a climatologist at the University of Idaho. He says El Nino in Idaho typically brings below normal temperatures and less precipitation, and another year like 2015 is not good news for the northern part of the state.