News

John Bazemore / AP

The Georgia school district said it was investigating the baseball players for "misbehavior" and "inappropriate physical contact." What it didn't reveal was that a younger teammate had reported being sexually assaulted.

Even after players were later disciplined for sexual battery, the district cited student confidentiality to withhold details from the public and used "hazing" to describe the incident, which it also failed to report to the state as required.

George Prentice / Boise State Public Radio

Boise State graduates its class of 2017 on Saturday, May 6, marking the university’s 100th commencement. And for the first time, the ceremony will take place on the famous blue turf of Albertson’s Stadium.

Boise State Public Radio has revived its internship program for Boise State students. We've had interns gain newsroom experience "unofficially" in recent years, but it's been a while since students were given course credit for their time at the station.

At the start of January 2017, Lantz McGinnis-Brown and Elizabeth Findley kicked off this new wave of internships by joining the news team for the semester. Over the course of five months they learned the daily processes and inner workings of a media organization, and eventually produced radio spots all on their own.

Zoo Boise

Zoo Boise marks a milestone Friday. It was twenty years ago that Steve Burns joined up with the zoo.

Back then, Steve Burns was working at the Nature Conservancy in Washington D.C. He shifted gears and took the job as the Executive Director of the Friends of Zoo Boise. After three-and-a-half years, he added head of Zoo Boise to his title and now holds both jobs.

Monash University / Flickr Creative Commons

A proposed for-profit osteopathic medical school in Idaho can begin construction after receiving the necessary approval from a national accreditation agency.

Officials announced Thursday that the proposed Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine had received its pre-accreditation status. This allows the school plans to break ground May 17 and open its doors to students in fall 2018.

Earlier this year, school officials had said that if that if work did not get underway by the end of April, the opening would be pushed to 2019.

Facebook

Organizers of Idaho Gives say the day-long event to raise money for Idaho nonprofits was a success. With donations topping $1.3 million, organizers beat their goal.

Kim Nilsson / Flickr

Ahead of August’s total solar eclipse which will pass through Idaho, the state’s Department of Commerce is launching a website to help eclipse watchers coming to the Gem State.

Anywhere from 500,000 to a million people are expected to descend on Idaho this August to watch the once-in-a-lifetime spectacle of day turning to night as the moon blots out the sun.

NIFC

The National Interagency Fire Center issued its Fire Potential Outlook this week. With the harsh winter depositing plenty of snow in the mountains, the risk of fire for the next few months in the upper elevations should be reduced.

Across Idaho, NIFC is predicting a slow start to the fire season – especially in the mountains, according to Bryan Henry. The manager at NIFC’s Predictive Serives says reserves of mountain snow from the winter are melting slowly.

Ūsful Glassworks / Facebook

Thursday, May 4 is Idaho Gives Day, when a number of charitable organizations team up to encourage donations to the nonprofit sector. Ūsful Glassworks is one of those. But for them, the May 4 deadline is a bit more dire.

Ūsful Glassworks takes abandoned glass bottles and turns them into usable items like windchimes, cups and soap dispensers. Their workforce is made up of at-risk youth, refugees, the homeless, low-income seniors and others who need a helping hand back into employment.

Richard Lam / CP, AP Images

The Trump Administration recently announced a 20 percent tariff on Canadian softwood lumber exports.

The trade dispute over softwood lumber is nothing new. Softwood lumber is what home builders use, and the Canadian market is a big one in the United States. According to University of Idaho forest economics professor Greg Latta, American companies have long felt that Canadians have an advantage because Canadians log on nationally-owned forests – amounting to a government subsidy.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

Zoo Boise is still reeling after the sudden loss of one of their two beloved giraffes, Julius Longfellow, in April. Since then, the zoo has been looking for a new companion for the remaining giraffe. Now it looks like they may have found one.

Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter on Wednesday asked the Idaho Supreme Court for permission to get involved in a lawsuit challenging how much time a governor has to veto legislation.

According to the petition, Otter's attorneys argue that the Republican governor should be allowed to intervene because it was Otter's veto that sparked the lawsuit and he wants to defend that decision in court. Currently, the lawsuit only names Secretary of State Lawerence Denney as a respondent.

Jay Peeples / Flickr

The Boise School District informed parents and guardians extra security will be on campus at Capital High School Friday in response to a threat found inside a bathroom stall. It’s the latest in a string of threats made against Treasure Valley schools.

Boise District spokesman Dan Hollar says while the threat is vague and not directed at a specific individual, it specified the date: Friday, May 5. Police are investigating and say they believe it's not credible, but in an abundance of caution they'll increase their presence at the school that day. No suspect has been identified.

Andrew Reed / Idaho Ed News

Jeff Dillon says he is running for state schools superintendent to help create a “climate of possibility.”

But first, the Wilder School District superintendent says he needs to raise money and elevate his statewide profile as he challenges a sitting incumbent. And that’s why he submitted his paperwork Friday to launch his campaign.

Laurie Stern / APM

The BBC/APM co-production, The Response - America's Story, shares listeners' unique stories about the lives they lead, and their hopes for the next four years. The four-part monthly series has offered Americans a chance to share their realities and reflections with the world, using the technology in their pockets.

The fourth and final episode was produced with 91.5 KBSX and explored the intersection between the personal and political. It features stories of contributors’ first 100 days of the new administration, and their place in society. 

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