IonCats / Flickr

A former Sun Valley treasurer has been accused of stealing almost $130,000 from the city.

The Idaho Mountain Express reports that Angela Marlene Orr pleaded not guilty on Monday to three counts of felony misuse of public funds by a public employee.

Orr is accused of stealing nearly $127,000 from the city through unauthorized direct deposits and by using the city's credit card to pay for dinners and hotel costs during city-sponsored trips.

Orr resigned April 7 after working for the city for nearly four years.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game

Idaho Fish and Game researchers are testing a new method of fish population control. The idea is to use a female hormone that causes male-born fish to produce eggs when they mature.

By using a hormonal treatment on the fish, the biologists hope to create a monosex trout population that will eventually be unable to breed, which could keep unwanted fish populations at bay in streams around the state.

Districts across the state will collect at least $7.7 million in “emergency” property taxes — money designed to cover the costs of growth.

In school funding parlance, the additional taxes are known as emergency levies. School districts qualify for emergency levies if their preliminary fall student numbers are up from the preceding year. School boards can pass an emergency levy without voter approval.

And for districts in the state’s growth areas, the emergency levy is a perennial tax of sorts — even though trustees can only approve the tax for one year at a time.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Republican National Committee co-chair Sharon Day spoke at the Ada County Republican Roundup at Governor Butch Otter’s ranch Tuesday. The Idaho visit was one of many she’s making to drum up support for presidential nominee Donald Trump and connect with local Republican leaders around the country.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Last fall, more than 1,400 international students attended Idaho State University. This year, the number of international students enrolled has dropped by 36 percent. The decline comes after reports of racially charged attacks against some ISU students from the Middle East last spring.  

Steve Slocum / AP

New federal standards mean that children from low-income families will spend more time in Head Start preschool classes.

The Times-News reports that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced new performance standards last week that are designed to improve the Head Start program. Under the new guidelines, Head Start will provide center-xollbased services four days a week instead of the two it offered before.

Two Idaho firefighters have received the state's highest honor for their exceptional bravery and courage.

Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, chairman of Idaho's Medal of Honor Commission, announced the award recipients Friday.

Idaho Falls firefighter Sean Allen was honored for entering a submerged vehicle in an irrigation canal, cutting a victim free and pulling him to safety last year.

Meanwhile, Kootenai County Fire and Rescue Lt. John Ward was honored for entering a burning home while off-duty in April, 2015 and rescuing a disabled woman without protective gear.

Boise Hive

A Boise nonprofit got a makeover and is ready to share its updated building with the community. The Boise Hive is celebrating its updated space with an open house Thursday from 5-9 p.m.

The Hive opened its doors on the Bench two years ago. The nonprofit serves musicians, offering rehearsal and recording space – but also mental health counseling for those struggling with issues like depression and anxiety.

Screenshot from video by Jason Urry / St. Lukes

Last month we told you the story of a Twin Falls doctor, who was once paralyzed, but was able to climb Idaho's tallest mountain. Now you can watch a video of his inspiring climb.

Jonathon Myers broke his neck ten years ago in a car accident. Paralyzed from the neck down, he fought back and learned how to walk again. He went to medical school and specialized in rehabilitation.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

A vital link between Boise State University and the heart of the capital city reopens today. The Broadway Bridge, which was constructed in just 9 months at a cost of around 20 million dollars, opens to pedestrians, bicyclists, and vehicles at 1 p.m.

Around 200 people gathered on the span of the new bridge to mark the opening just a day before the first home game at BSU.

Idaho is working to reduce suicides in the state with a new $1 million program.

The Spokesman-Review reports that lawmakers this year allocated ongoing funding and changed the law that governs the mission of the state Department of Health and Welfare to specifically include suicide prevention.

To celebrate the ongoing efforts, Boise Mayor Dave Bieter on Thursday declared this week Suicide Prevention Week in the city.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Barbara Perry Bauer likes to use the line from the movie The Sixth Sense, “I see dead people.” But she doesn’t mean it literally. This local historian is obsessed with the people and places that shaped Boise. Lately, she’s been seeing a lot of ghosts of groceries past in the North End neighborhood.

Jon Rawlinson / Flickr Creative Commons

A national education policy advocacy organization is holding its 3rd annual conference in Boise this week. The agenda is mostly what you’d expect, a lot of speeches, which started Wednesday night and run through Friday. But the conference also features a reality TV twist.

Idaho Transporation Department

Idaho Transportation Department officials will celebrate their newest infrastructure upgrade this Friday. The much-anticipated reopening of the Broadway Bridge comes right before the first Bronco home football game, when fans will get to walk, bike or drive across the structure which is next to the stadium.

Both Mayor Dave Bieter and Boise State University President Bob Kustra will attend the Friday morning ceremony.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

The woman known as Mother Teresa was recognized as a saint by the Catholic Church on Sunday. More than 100,000 people filled St. Peter's Square for the ceremony honoring a person who'd spent much of her life in India, helping the poor, the sick and the dying.

A Boise man who met Mother Teresa and spent time in her ministry says he knew this day would come. Rick Harvey is a local jeweler who also serves as an Archdeacon in the Episcopal Diocese.

Non-union workers in Idaho could be required to pay some fees to the unions that represent them if a lawsuit pending in federal court succeeds.

The Spokesman-Review reports that the Idaho Attorney General's office has filed a motion asking the federal judge to dismiss the lawsuit.


The Wildland Fire Leadership Council is meeting for the first time in Boise. The national committee was created in 2002, and includes officials from different national and state firefighting agencies. They meet regularly, often not leaving Washington D.C.

Wednesday, the group is getting a chance to see the effects of wildfire in the Great Basin firsthand.

Residents of a small central Idaho town say they don't want a camp for kids with cancer in their neighborhood.

Camp Rainbow Gold holds summer camps for children and families dealing with cancer at a private campsite in the Sawtooth Mountains. Organizers announced last month they were in the process of buying a larger property in the unincorporated neighborhood of Triumph near the resort town of Ketchum. Camp Rainbow Gold leaders say the move would allow more kids to attend camp.

Brad Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

Ross Winton has been spending a lot of time lately catching butterflies in south-central Idaho and putting tiny stickers on their wings. That’s so they can be identified by scientists who see them in other places. But Winton, a biologist with Idaho’s Department of Fish and Game, thinks now the last of them may have moved out of state for the season. Winton is part of a regional monarch butterfly study. He says scientists know in great detail where a monarch born in upstate New York or Michigan or Northern California will travel in its life.   

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo has completed his mission of visiting every incorporated city in Idaho over the past two years.

The Spokesman-Review reports that Crapo, a Republican, checked off his final town last week with a stop in Wardner in North Idaho's Silver Valley.

He had hoped to hold hour-long, town-hall-style meetings in each of the 200 cities, but not all of them had town halls. In those cases, Crapo held meetings in parks -- and, in one case, under a picnic shelter during a rainstorm.