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The Two-Way
5:06 am
Fri April 18, 2014

As Rescue Efforts Continue, Korean Ferry Sinks Below Surface

Cranes, ships and other rescue equipment are on the scene off the southern coast of South Korea, where a ferry capsized Wednesday. About 270 people, most of them high school students, remain missing.
Kim Hong-Ji Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 7:01 am

As darkness fell Friday in the Yellow Sea off South Korea's southern coast, there was still no good news to report about efforts to determine if any of the nearly 270 people missing since a passenger ferry capsized Wednesday might still be alive inside the sunken ship.

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All Songs Considered
5:03 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Drum Fill Friday, From Guest Quizmaster S. Carey

Sean Carey, who writes and records as S. Carey, performing live with Bon Iver.
Ollie Millington Redferns

This week's drum fills (and intros) were hand-selected, using only the finest ingredients, by Sean Carey. The former Bon Iver drummer, who writes and records as S. Carey, just released his second solo album, Range Of Light. I thought some of his picks for this week's puzzler were pretty challenging, but I managed to get three of the five right. See how you do!

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Around the Nation
4:59 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Indiana Man Lets Buyer Keep His Stolen Car

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:21 am

A 72-year-old man thought the deal he got on a car was too good to be true so he looked up its rightful owner. Derk West decided the older man needed the car more than he did so he let him keep it.

Business
4:40 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Obama Wants To Sell Exports To Asia, But Critics Aren't Buying

Members of Japan's farmers association protest against the Trans-Pacific Partnership free-trade talks at a rally in Tokyo in March 2013.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Next week, President Obama is going to Asia, where he'll talk up a proposed deal to increase U.S. trade with that region.

If he succeeds, he could open up huge new markets for U.S. farmers and manufactures, strengthen U.S. influence in Asia and set a path to greater prosperity.

At least, that's what the White House says.

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Politics
4:36 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Chelsea Clinton Announces She's Pregnant

Chelsea's parents — Bill and Hillary — sent out tweets confirming the news. The former president wrote that he's excited to add a new line to his Twitter bio: grandfather to be.

Shots - Health News
4:33 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Why Mumps And Measles Can Spread Even When We're Vaccinated

Potent but not perfect: Medical assistant Elissa Ortivez prepares a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at a clinic in Walsenburg, Colo.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:05 am

More than two months after a nasty mumps virus triggered fever, headache and painfully swollen glands among a handful of students at Ohio State University, the outbreak has ballooned to 234 cases at last count, and has spilled into the surrounding community in Columbus, Ohio.

"Columbus officials are calling it the city's biggest outbreak since the development of the mumps vaccine in the 1940s," WOSU reporter Steve Brown tells Shots. "It even pushed them to open a new clinic."

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Plunge In Circulation Forces Changes At Japanese Magazine

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:18 am

Wonderful Wife was a top seller when more women stayed at home and took care of the kids. Now that more women stay on the job, the publisher replaced it with a magazine aimed at working mothers.

NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Inmates To Be Moved Temporarily Out Of Infamous Iraqi Prison

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:18 am

Kelly McEvers talks to Ned Parker, Baghdad bureau chief for the Reuters news agency, about the temporary closure of Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison. Its 2,400 inmates will be transferred.

NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Colombia Mourns Death Of Favorite Son: Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:18 am

Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 87, died on Thursday. He made Colombia synonymous with literature, particularly the dreamlike, whimsical story-telling known as magical realism.

NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Budget Cuts Threaten Mock Villages At Military Training Center

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:18 am

David Greene talks to Weekend All Things Considered host Arun Rath about his trip to Fort Irwin National Training Center located in the Mojave Desert in Southern California.

NPR Story
3:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Many Sunken Ferry Victims Believed To Be Trapped Below Deck

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:21 am

The rescue and recovery mission is continuing off the southern coast of South Korea after a ferry capsized earlier this week. More than 200 people are missing. Bad weather is hampering the efforts.

StoryCorps
1:34 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Born With HIV, Building A Future

Cristina Peña was born with HIV. In high school, she was afraid to tell her boyfriend, Chris Ondaatje, about her illness. The couple have been together for 13 years.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:46 am

Cristina Peña was born in 1984 with HIV. Her father died from AIDS, and her mother is still living with HIV. Cristina was told she had HIV when she was 9, but she and her family kept it a secret from her schoolmates and friends.

In high school, she started dating Chris Ondaatje. One day, Chris decided to tell Cristina that he was in love with her.

That's when Cristina sat him down for a revelation of her own.

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Parallels
1:33 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Sunni Discontent Fuels Growing Violence In Iraq's Anbar Province

Iraqi Sunni masked protesters burn tires to block the main highway to Jordan and Syria, outside Fallujah, Iraq, on Dec. 30. Violence has returned to Iraq's Anbar province, with discontented ordinary Sunnis joining forces with al-Qaida-linked militants battling the Iraqi government.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:42 am

Violence has reignited in western Iraq, with Islamist fighters taking over much of Anbar province three months ago. A renegade al-Qaida group has set up its headquarters in Fallujah — the city where hundreds of U.S. soldiers died a decade ago, trying to wrest it from insurgent control.

But this time, the enemy isn't the U.S. and it's not just extremists fighting. Ordinary Sunnis in Anbar, furious at what they call years of discrimination by the Shiite-dominated government, have joined the militants' battle against the Iraqi army.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
1:31 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

The student population at D'Leisha Dent's high school, Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., is almost entirely African-American. Dent says she and her peers wish they had more opportunities to interact with white students.
Maisie Crow

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:55 am

The investigative journalism group ProPublica, with reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones, has just completed a yearlong project, Segregation Now, exploring the re-segregation of schools in the U.S., with a particular look at Tuscaloosa, Ala.

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The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Even Chimps Know That A Firm Bed Makes For Quality Sleep

A chimpanzee hangs from a tree trunk in Kibale National Park in Uganda. A new study indicates that chimps prefer a specific tree for sleeping.
James Akena Reuters/Landov

In the wilds of Africa, chimpanzees consistently choose to make their sleeping nests in a particular tree that offers the "just right" kind of comfort that Goldilocks famously preferred.

That's according to a new study in the journal PLOS ONE that could also bolster a theory that solid shut-eye may have been a key to human evolution.

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The Salt
4:31 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

Jelly Belly says its most popular flavors include the savory-sweet Buttered Popcorn and Very Cherry.
Meg Vogel/NPR

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:03 pm

This Easter, you can drown your sorrows in a glass of Jellybean milk — or with a pile of beer-flavored jelly beans.

The new twists are a sign that jelly beans are continuing their march to candyland domination. Americans buy 16 billion beans in the Easter season alone (mid-February until the actual holiday), according to the National Confectioners Association. The candy even has its own holiday on April 22.

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Politics
4:02 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Obama's Favorite County — At Least When It Comes To Giving Speeches

President Obama speaks during an April 7 visit to Bladensburg High School in Bladensburg, Md. It was his fourth visit to Prince George's County in as many months.
Aude Guerrucci-Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:11 pm

Residents of Prince George's County, Md., might just get sick of hearing "Hail to the Chief." President Obama has visited this county to deliver policy addresses more than any other in his second term.

"Hello Maryland. It's good to see you," the president said enthusiastically in January at a Costco in Lanham, Md. "I love to get outside of the Beltway, even if it is just a few hundred feet away."

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Movies
3:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

A Story Of Torture And Forgiveness That Spans A Half-Century

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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Around the Nation
3:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

The Ohio Snake Art That's Been Mid-Slither For A Millennium

The Serpent Mound in southern Ohio is 3 feet high and more than 1,300 feet long.
Courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society.

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

In new installment of the Spring Break series, Noah Adams visits the Serpent Mound in southern Ohio. It's not a burial site; it's a massive, grass-covered effigy of a snake, created a thousand years ago.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Law
3:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

When Being Pregnant Also Means Being Out Of A Job

While many women continue to work with little change in their duties while pregnant, others find that pregnancy can be a career liability.
Yuri Arcurs iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:06 pm

The workplace has become a more understanding place for pregnant women or new moms these days. Many companies now have lactation rooms and offer more liberal maternity and paternity leave policies than in years past.

But for some women, pregnancy can still be a career liability.

Heather Myers was fresh out of high school and working at a Wal-Mart in Salina, Kan., in 2006 when she found out she was pregnant. She kept a water bottle with her on the sales floor, as her doctor recommended. Then, her supervisor intervened.

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