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The Shroud of Turin, an artifact that many people believe to be the burial cloth of Jesus of Nazareth, goes back on public display for the first time in five years in the Italian city that bears its name.

The shroud can be seen by the public until June 24 at the cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Turin. Anyone who wants to view it can do so for free, but must first sign-up online. Already a million people have done so, according to the BBC.

The self-declared Islamic State has released a new video purporting to show its followers shooting or beheading some 30 Ethiopian Christians in two separate locations in Libya, as a masked man dressed in black issues a stark warning to the West.

Reuters says of the video, reported by the SITE Intelligence Group, that it "portrays Christians as crusaders out to kill Muslims and then showed about 15 men beheaded on a beach and another group of the same size shot in their heads in scrubland."

According to Reuters:

Hundreds of would-be migrants from North Africa who were trying to reach Europe are missing and feared drowned after their boat capsized about 120 miles south of the Italian island of Lampedusa. Officials say it could be the largest-ever such tragedy on the Mediterranean.

For Republicans running for president — or eyeing it — this weekend was a big opportunity.

GOP presidential hopefuls from Marco Rubio to Ted Cruz to Carly Fiorina to Donald Trump descended on New Hampshire this weekend. The 19 candidates, and potential candidates, gathered in Nashua, N.H., for an event sponsored by the state Republican Party. They wooed activists and jockeyed for early position in the state that holds the first presidential primary.

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Noah Wall is an experimental musician in New York, and his latest album is maybe his boldest experiment yet.

"I usually make sort of very meticulously crafted music, and I think that's important because this project is so different from that," Wall tells NPR's Rachel Martin.

The album, Live At Guitar Center, is a series of recordings of nameless musicians — both newbies and old-timers — at the music equipment store Guitar Center.

They're testing out the guitars, keyboards and synthesizers, and have no idea they're being recorded.

"If aliens beamed onto Earth and read our school textbooks, they wouldn't have a clue about what women contribute to our society," says Rae Blumberg, a sociologist at the University of Virginia.

Blumberg has spent years looking at textbooks from all over the world. In almost every country she has studied, women are either completely written out of texts — or they're portrayed in stereotypical, often subservient roles.

Step aside, home chefs! The kitchen of the future draws near.

No, there's no hydrator from Marty McFly's kitchen in Back to the Future II. Right now, the chef of the future looks like a pair of robotic arms that descend from the ceiling of a very organized kitchen. And it makes a mean crab bisque.

Netflix's original series now have a superhero among them. Comic fans know Daredevil as a crusader. He's a Marvel character who, in addition to his superhuman abilities, has a very human disability: blindness.

Needless to say, Daredevil has quite a few fans with visual impairments — and they were looking forward to the show.

But until this week, Netflix had no plans to provide the audio assistance that could have helped those fans follow the show.

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Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Last summer, I spoke with dog trainer and former Marine, Abe Mashal. In 2010, he needed to fly to a job - nothing unusual. But things got weird at the airport when he handed his driver's license to the woman at the ticket counter.

The culinary world lost a visionary this week. Homaru Cantu, a specialist in the avant-garde approach to cooking known as molecular gastronomy, died Tuesday in Chicago at the age of 38. The Cook County Medical Examiner ruled Cantu's death a suicide.

Every visit to Cantu's flagship restaurant, Michelin-starred Moto, was a trip down the rabbit hole.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

When Politicians Lose Their Accents

17 hours ago
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Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker is one of the presidential hopefuls speaking at that GOP event. And the way Walker speaks has been getting some close scrutiny lately. Check out this clip from when he was running for governor of Wisconsin.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED SPEECH)

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