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3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Legal Battle Over Affirmative Action Continues

Steve Inskeep talks to Columbia University president Lee Bollinger about the Supreme Court's most recent decision to uphold Michigan's affirmative action ban. Bollinger was president at the University of Michigan during the groundbreaking 2003 Supreme Court Affirmative Action Cases.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

How Hospitals Can Reduce Disabilities For Stroke Patients

Research finds when hospitals initiate rapid response programs to treat stroke victims, response time is cut and fewer patients die and fewer have significant disability.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

San Francisco Library Hires Social Worker To Help Homeless Patrons

Many urban libraries have become de facto homeless shelters. Their presence concerns librarians and patrons, especially parents who want libraries to be a safe place for their children to study. San Francisco's library system has hired a full-time social worker to help find housing and other services for the homeless men and women who've set up camp among the stacks.

Education
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Tulsa, Combining Preschool With Help For Parents

Shartara Wallace picks up her son James, 4, from preschool in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

At preschools in Tulsa, Okla., teachers are well-educated and well-paid, and classrooms are focused on play, but are still challenging. One nonprofit in Tulsa, the Community Action Project, has flipped the script on preschool. The idea behind its Career Advance program is simple: To help kids, the group believes, you often have to help their parents.

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Education
3:03 am
Wed April 23, 2014

One Approach To Head Start: To Help Kids, Help Their Parents

Tiffany Contreras walks her daughter Kyndall, 4, to preschool at Disney Elementary in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

President Obama has called repeatedly on Congress to help states pay for "high-quality preschool" for all. In fact, those two words — "high quality" — appear time and again in the president's prepared remarks. They are also a refrain among early childhood education advocates and researchers. But what do they mean? And what separates the best of the nation's preschool programs from the rest?

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Europe
2:34 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Putin's Chess Moves In Ukraine: Brilliant Tactics, But Bad Strategy?

Protesters play chess in Independence Square in Kiev last winter. Some would say that Russian President Putin is playing geopolitical chess when it comes to Ukraine.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:23 am

The game of chess is a national pastime in Russia. And you might say that Vladimir Putin is playing a high-stakes game of geopolitical chess when it comes to Ukraine.

Western leaders are plotting how to counter Putin's latest moves with economic sanctions. So to get some insight into what might come next, we talked to an economist who knows Russia — who is also extremely good at chess.

Putin Playing From A Weak Position

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All Tech Considered
2:33 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

A Google data center in Oklahoma is shown. Google recently slashed prices for its cloud services; Amazon responded by cutting its cloud prices.
Connie Zhou AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:23 am

This week, our tech reporting team is exploring cloud computing — the big business of providing computing power and data storage that companies need, but which happens out of sight, as if it's "in the cloud."

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U.S.
2:31 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Subminimum Wages For The Disabled: Godsend Or Exploitation?

Workers shrink wrap products at the Sertoma Centre located just outside of Chicago.
Courtesy of Sertoma Centre

The president recently signed an executive order raising the minimum hourly wage to $10.10 for workers employed by federal contractors — including those with disabilities.

That's a victory for disabled workers who can make just pennies per hour at so-called sheltered workplaces.

While some call sheltered workshops a godsend, others say they are examples of good intentions gone wrong.

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Around the Nation
2:30 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Race To Unearth Civil War-Era Artifacts Before Developer Digs In

Archaeologist Chester DePratter stands by the site of Camp Asylum, the Civil War-era prison in Columbia, S.C. The site will soon be cleared to make room for a mixed-use development.
Susanne Schafer AP

About a dozen or so archaeologists in downtown Columbia, S.C. are focused on a 165-acre sliver of land that used to be a prisoner of war camp during the Civil War. Last summer, the property was sold and the group is trying to recover as many artifacts as they can before a developer builds condos and shops in its place.

"We're out here to salvage what we can in advance of that development," says Chester DePratter, a University of South Carolina archaeologist.

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Law
2:29 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Citizen Volunteers Arm Themselves Against Crime In Rural Oregon

An old police car is permanently parked on the highway through O'Brien, Ore., where cuts to the sheriff's office have prompted some locals to mount armed patrols.
Jeff Barnard AP

It's after 10 p.m. as Sam Nichols slowly cruises through the tiny town of O'Brien, Ore., shining superbright spotlights into the shadows.

"We're just checking this commercial building here, just to make sure there's no one hiding around it or anything," Nichols says.

Nichols' King Cab pickup has a yellow flasher on top and signs on the doors identifying it as a Citizens Against Crime patrol. Riding with Nichols is fellow volunteer Alan Cress.

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NPR Story
7:21 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Washington State Senator: Oil Trains 'Going To Be With Us For A While'

File photo of a crude oil train.

Environmental regulators in Washington state are expecting a lively crowd Thursday in the coastal city of Hoquiam.

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NPR Story
6:50 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Judge Won't Issue Immediate Decision In Oregon Gay Marriage Case

File photo of the Wayne L. Morse United States Courthouse in Eugene, Ore.

A federal judge in Oregon will not issue an immediate decision Wednesday in a lawsuit seeking to overturn the state's ban on same-sex marriage.

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NPR Story
6:32 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Wanapum Dam Fix Could Cost $61 Million

File photo of a crew investigating the crack in Wanapum Dam near Vantage, Wash.

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:04 pm

Officials in central Washington revealed the latest update on how much it will cost to fix the massive crack in Wanapum Dam -- and how long it will take.

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NPR Story
5:49 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

President Obama Tells Landslide Towns 'Whole Country is Thinking of You'

President Barack Obama speaks to an audience of first responders at the Oso fire house in Snohomish County, Wash.

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 7:12 pm

President Obama told an audience of first responders at the Oso fire house in Snohomish County that he and First Lady Michelle Obama "grieve with you."

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Law
5:40 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Supreme Court Gives Police New Power To Rely On Anonymous Tips

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that police can stop and search a driver based solely on an anonymous 911 tip.

The 5-4 decision split the court's two most conservative justices, with Justice Clarence Thomas writing for the majority and Justice Antonin Scalia penning the dissent.

In August 2008, an anonymous 911 caller in California phoned in a report that a pickup truck had run her off the road. The caller gave the location of the incident, plus the make and model of the truck and the license plate number.

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NPR Story
5:08 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Appreciative Crowd Awaits President Obama In Oso

A crowd has gathered to hear President Obama speak at the Oso Fire Station in Snohomish County, Wash.

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:25 pm

Snohomish County first responders are gathering in the Oso fire house for an appearance by President Barack Obama.

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The Two-Way
4:52 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

U.S. Says It's Monitoring For Possible North Korea Nuclear Test

South Korean protesters hold pictures of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a rally last week in Seoul. Recent satellite imagery indicates the possibility that Pyongyang is readying for a new nuclear test.
Lee Jin-man AP

The United States is urging North Korea to refrain from a new nuclear test amid indications of "heightened activity" at Pyongyang's Punggye-ri test site.

"We have certainly seen the press reports ... regarding possible increased activity in North Korea's nuclear test site," State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said. "We are closely monitoring the situation on the Korean peninsula."

Reuters says:

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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Soldier Speaks Up A Decade After Pat Tillman's Friendly-Fire Death

Pat Tillman, in a 2003 photo provided by Photography Plus. Tillman was killed in a friendly-fire incident in Afghanistan on April 22, 2004.
AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 5:31 pm

Ten years after the friendly-fire incident in Afghanistan that killed U.S. Army Ranger and former NFL star Pat Tillman, one of the soldiers who mistakenly pulled the trigger says he's still haunted by demons from the night of April 22, 2004.

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Mountain Stage
2:56 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Justin Townes Earle On Mountain Stage

Justin Townes Earle.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Justin Townes Earle makes his third appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.Va.

Earle's early songwriting drew comparisons to heavyweights like Bruce Springsteen, Arlo Guthrie and his own father, Steve Earle, but fans quickly recognized his own original voice as a musician. He earned the Emerging Artist of the Year award from the Americana Music Association in 2009. The same organization gave him its Song of the Year award in 2011 for the title track from Harlem River Blues.

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Sports
2:50 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

A Knuckleball No More: World Cup Soccer Ball Gets A Redesign

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:38 pm

John Eric Goff, the chair of the physics department at Lynchburg College, explains the science of the 2014 World Cup soccer ball. The Adidas Brazuca is expected to perform better than the version used in South Africa in 2010.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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