Associated Press

Authorities say a south-central Idaho man responding to a Craigslist ad offering a car for sale shot and killed one man and wounded another with an assault weapon before stealing the car.

Police say 20-year-old Jacob Lyn Marshall of Jackson was arrested Saturday evening hours after the shooting when he rammed a police car with the stolen 1991 Mitsubishi 3000 VR4.

Police also arrested 22-year-old Jerry Burton Kimball, who authorities say accompanied Marshall.

Former Idaho House Speaker Tom Boyd has died.

The Lewiston Tribune reports that the Republican lawmaker who served eight terms in the Idaho Legislature from 1977 to 1992 died Monday at a nursing home in Moscow. He was 86.

Boyd represented Latah County for 16 years, the last six as speaker.

Lawmakers described him as a "peacemaker" and "consensus builder."

Boyd farmed wheat and peas in the Genesee area and served on local boards before running for state office.

Scott Graf / Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter has created a task force intended to strengthen the state's protections against computer hackers.

Otter on Monday announced that he signed an executive order creating the Idaho Cybersecurity Cabinet Task Force.

Otter in a statement says the task force will develop policies, programs and strategies to find vulnerabilities and prevent attacks.

He says the state's long-term economic competitiveness is linked to cybersecurity.

Jerry McFarland / Flickr

More than a quarter million sockeye salmon returning from the ocean to spawn are either dead or dying in the Columbia River and its tributaries due to warming water temperatures.

Federal and state fisheries biologists say water that is 5 to 6 degrees warmer is wiping out at least half of this year's returning population of the cold-water species.

Ritchie Graves of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says up to 80 percent of the population could ultimately perish.

Officials are trying to cool flows by releasing cold water from selected reservoirs.

The Idaho Attorney General's Office is now investigating a former custom boat maker who moved to upstate New York to open a new business, leaving behind unfinished boats and multiple lawsuits.

The Idaho Transportation Department has agreed to pay a $52,000 fine after demolishing an asbestos-containing building in northern Idaho and potentially exposing the public to the cancer-causing fibers.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced the agreement Thursday involving the November demolition of the state-owned building in Priest River.

The federal agency says the state agency failed to do an asbestos survey before the demolition and only learned of the demolition after receiving a public complaint.

BLM

Authorities say a cyclist started a 73-acre wildfire in southwest Idaho by lighting his toilet paper on fire after taking a comfort break.

U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials say the cyclist stopped to defecate in a ravine in the Boise foothills on Wednesday afternoon. The man then lit the toilet paper on fire but lost control of the embers in the dry grass while trying to extinguishing the waste.

Firefighters contained the flames several hours later.

A city in northern Idaho is joining a hundred others across the country in offering safe meeting places for people selling or buying through online platforms like Craigslist.

Coeur d'Alene police Sgt. Christie Wood says people can now use the department's parking lot during normal business hours to conduct business, a practice similar to one put in place by the Post Falls Police Department.

Benjamin Lim / Flickr

A federal appeals court has rejected a request by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to dismiss a lawsuit by Idaho officials seeking to prevent Texas Hold 'Em poker tournaments at the tribe's casino.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals also on Wednesday upheld U.S. District Court Judge B. Lynn Winmill's injunction issued in September preventing the tribe from holding the tournaments while the lawsuit moves forward.

Idaho officials sued the tribe in May 2014 contending all forms of poker are banned under Idaho's Constitution and state law.

Scott Ki / Boise State Public Radio

Attorneys representing Idaho inmates in a class action lawsuit over prison health care told a federal judge Wednesday that prison officials intentionally misled a court-appointed examiner and the department should be punished by the court.

But attorneys for the state denied the inmates' claims and countered that the allegations are based on incomplete evidence that has been taken out of context.

Courtesy of American Center for Law and Justice

Iran's deputy foreign minister says Iranian diplomats discussed the case of Americans still held captive by Tehran. That includes Boise pastor Saeed Abedini. The issue was raised on the sidelines of negotiations in Vienna earlier this month that led to the landmark deal on curbing Iran's nuclear program.

Abbas Araghchi told reporters in the Iranian capital on Wednesday that cases of "imprisoned citizens" were discussed with their American counterparts during the nuclear talks.

He says "humanitarian" reasons had motivated the discussion but did not elaborate.

Still Burning / Flickr

An 11th person has joined a sex abuse lawsuit involving Nampa's Idaho Juvenile Corrections Center.

The Idaho Press Tribune reports attorney Bruce Skaug of Skaug Law PC in Nampa is representing the 11 claimants. This newest filing in the lawsuit says 41-year-old Valerie Lieteau performed oral sex on a juvenile inmate and had sex with him in her office.

Lieteau was a nurse at the center from 2008 to 2012.

More questions than answers hang around Idaho lawmakers grappling over the now defunct statewide school broadband access program.

A legislative interim committee met Tuesday to begin determining whether the Idaho Legislature should attempt a new statewide broadband program.

Idaho's broadband program dissolved earlier this year after a district judge ruled the $60 million contract that created the system was illegal. This left individual school districts scrambling to secure their own broadband access contracts for the upcoming school year.

Kari Greer / Boise National Forest

Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter says closing public access to some state forest lands amid wildfire concerns by private timberland owners is an option that has to be considered due to extreme fire danger this year.

Consultant Jim Riley on Tuesday told Otter and other members of the Idaho Land Board that a million acres of private land has been closed this year to the public due to potential wildfire.

Riley says the private owners are concerned about human-caused fires starting on state land and spreading to neighboring timber stands.

Forest History Society / Flickr

State officials have given their OK to modify a northern Idaho timber sale to include helicopter logging that will cost the state up to $1.5 million in lost revenue.

The Idaho Land Board voted 4-0 on Tuesday following a federal court ruling earlier this month that put the Selway Fire Salvage timber sale on hold by temporarily banning the use of a contested U.S. Forest Service road.

Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter says it's disappointing but the Land Board had little choice.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

A former College of Southern Idaho vice president, who claims she was discriminated against based on her gender and national origin, is suing the college.

The Times-News reports that Edit Szanto filed the suit in U.S. District Court last week against the school's board of trustees, President Jeff Fox and former interim president Curtis Eaton.

Szanto worked at the college for 17 years and was put on involuntary paid leave in January 2014. Szanto claims she was the victim of discrimination because she is a woman and an immigrant.

Derek Bruff / Flickr

A study by a rural education group has found that the four-day school week some Idaho schools have adopted has not been saving money as they were intended.

The Spokesman-Review reports that the Rural Opportunities Consortium of Idaho, an initiative of the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation, found that some districts saw their costs rise after the switch to a shorter week. There was little data on the educational impact of the schedule.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

A Christian advocacy group is arguing that a federal judge should not dismiss their lawsuit against a northern Idaho city, challenging that the city's anti-discrimination ordinance violates the wedding chapel owners' religious rights.

Attorneys on both sides of the issue presented their arguments in U.S. District Court on Monday. U.S. Magistrate Judge Ronald Bush is expected to issue a decision in the next few weeks.

The Alliance Defending Freedom contends that the Coeur d'Alene ordinance compels Hitching Post owners Don and Lynn Knapp to perform same-sex marriages.

barbed wire, prison
Havankevin / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal judge says an Idaho inmate can move forward with his lawsuit against the state even though he's already won a six-figure settlement from the state's prison health care provider.

William Bown, an inmate at the Idaho Maximum Security Institution south of Boise, filed the lawsuit in 2012 after he had a heart attack. Bown contended that the prison guards and the medical care providers failed to realize the seriousness of his condition and sent him to an observation cell instead of calling for emergency care.

snake river, canyon
ChadH / Flickr Creative Commons

The Bureau of Land Management is considering what to do about reports of overcrowding on the South Fork of the Snake River.

The Post Register reports the Upper Snake Field Office of the BLM will be holding a series of focus group and gathering input in other ways during a 30-day public comment period.

Proposed solutions include limiting the number of people who float the river, limiting boat access, limiting outfitter use and requiring campsite reservations.

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