Associated Press

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The city of Pocatello says the entire population of cats at its animal shelter will be euthanized to stop the spread of an upper respiratory infection outbreak.

The Pocatello Animal Shelter says officials last month noticed a number of cats at the shelter with symptoms. Animal services director Mary Remer says the cats did not respond to about a week of treatment.

After consulting with local veterinarians and the Idaho Humane Society, officials say they determined that all the cats were infected and that it was necessary to euthanize them.

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Idaho public schools have received nearly $16 million after the state auctioned off cabins at Priest Lake.

The Spokesman-Review reports 35 lakefront cabin sites were purchased by the cabin owners for an average of $447,000 each at the Friday auction at the Coeur d'Alene Resort.

The highest-priced parcel in the auction went for $643,000, and the lowest-priced sold for $341,000.

Courtesy: J.R. Simplot Company

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved a potato genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine and that still damages crops.

Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Co. says that the Russet Burbank can also be stored at colder temperatures longer to reduce food waste.

The potato is the second generation of Simplot's Innate potatoes and also includes the first generation's reduced bruising and a greater reduction in a chemical produced at high temperatures that some studies have shown can cause cancer.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Republican presidential hopeful Rand Paul stopped in Boise as part of his Western tour to rally support and attract voters in a red-dominated state that is likely to have its pick of candidates during the GOP primary election.

Paul spoke to nearly 300 people at Boise State University on Thursday. He then left an afternoon rally in Nampa that's followed by a GOP barbeque in Idaho Falls.

The Kentucky senator's swing through the West has already included rallies in Alaska and Washington, with other stops planned in Utah and Wyoming.

Lacey Daley / Boise State Public Radio

A federal judge in North Dakota has blocked a new rule that would give the federal government jurisdiction over some state waters.

U.S. District Judge Ralph Erickson of North Dakota issued a temporary injunction Thursday against the Obama administration rule. The rule gives the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers authority to protect some streams, tributaries and wetlands under the Clean Water Act.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game

A nearly toothless, 25-year-old male grizzly bear that repeatedly broke into buildings in eastern Idaho has been euthanized.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game in a statement Thursday says the grizzly was killed Monday near Island Park because it had become habituated to human-related foods.

Regional Wildlife Manager Curtis Hendricks says the bear made no direct threat to humans but its advanced age and decreasing ability to forage naturally increased the potential for conflict.

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A Canyon County high school student has been asked to remove a Confederate flag from his truck because administrators worry it is a gang symbol.

KIVI-TV reports that Cossa Academy student Jordan Beattie says he hung the flag from his truck after his girlfriend gave it to him as a gift. His mother Sherry Beattie says when he came to the Wilder school with the flag displayed he was called to the school office.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

This academic year marks the first that a remote Idaho school district will make guns available to trained staff members in the event that an active shooter is on the 300-student campus.

KBOI-TV reports Superintendent Greg Alexander says it can take 45 minutes or longer for emergency responders to reach the Garden Valley School District, prompting officials to buy four rifles, put them in gun safes and train a few staff members in how to use them.

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Idaho officials aren't ruling out that new state parks could be named after private companies that give large donations or sponsorships, but a recently proposed set of rules would severely limit business' ability to acquire naming rights.

Earlier this year, Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter signed legislation permitting the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to pursue sponsorships with corporations to help offset slashed state revenue. Now department officials are finalizing sponsorship rules, which will need approval from the department board and Idaho Legislature.

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An Idaho-based company that makes most of the retardant used on wildfires has stopped making the substance in its traditional rusty red, opting instead for a hot pink color.

The Missoulian reports that Phos-Chek representative Lou Gildemeister says pilots report that the pink clouds have better visibility.

Air tankers draw lines of retardant around the perimeter of a wildfire, but if they can't see where the substance lands they could leave gaps.

Boise National Forest

Australian and New Zealand firefighters have arrived in the United States and on Monday prepared to fan out to help fight wildfires burning in several western states.

The 70 firefighters are scheduled to receive protective equipment at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, where an air quality alert is in effect due to smoke from regional wildfires.

Redspotted / Flickr Creative Commons

A federal judge has scheduled a hearing Friday in Fargo on an effort by 13 states to block a new rule that gives federal authorities jurisdiction over some state waters.

The states, led by North Dakota, argue that the rules from the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers illegally expand those agencies' powers under the federal Clean Water Act.

The law goes into effect next week. The states want the judge to order an injunction to suspend the new rules.

Many landowners are worried even a ditch or puddle could fall under the new federal regulations.

Hanson Dodge Creative

Almost as important as how fast the U.S. athletes run this week at world championships is how they look doing it.

The gear the Americans wear in Beijing is worth millions of dollars for the country's track and field federation, even though each individual athlete can only hope to see a small fraction of it.

And Nick Symmonds won't get a penny.

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Among the images of destruction that have come from the wildfires tearing up the West is one showing an act of kindness by a family of dogs in Idaho.

The photo, taken in wildfire-ravaged Kamiah by Louis Armstrong on Monday, shows a sheep dog and two puppies standing guard at the body of a fawn.

Armstrong was checking out his family's 300 acres after the wildfire ripped through the area, when he noticed his neighbor's dogs protecting the body and snapped the photo.

Ada County Sheriff's Office

A former employee at the Idaho State Correctional Institution has been arrested for sexual contact with an inmate.

The Idaho Statesman reports 22-year-old Shauna Lynn Kelly was arrested Monday and is being held in the Ada County Jail on a $75,000 bond.

Detectives began investigating the allegations in March after being contacted by Idaho Department of Corrections officials.

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If you're looking for milepost 420, you won't find it in Idaho.

Idaho transportation officials say the mile marker has been replaced with 419.9 signs to curb thieves eager to own a number associated with marijuana enthusiasts.

Turns out, Idaho isn't alone in this problem. States like Washington and Colorado have also replaced 420 signs with 419.9 after consistently having to replace them after thefts by supposed sticky-fingered stoners.

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Federal authorities have announced a plan to produce massive quantities of seeds from native plants so they can be quickly planted to help the land recover from natural disasters such as wildfires and hurricanes.

The U.S. Department of the Interior said Monday that the program will make landscapes more resilient and healthier, especially Western rangelands where massive wildfires have been an increasing problem.

Boise National Forest/USFS

The National Interagency Fire Center is calling on 200 active-duty military troops to help fight roughly 95 wildfires burning across the West.

Officials with the Boise-based agency made the announcement Monday. The troops will begin training Wednesday and are expected to be ready for action Sunday. They will be mobilized for a month. NIFC officials say previous call-ups have included more soldiers, but that the smaller force will be ready sooner. 

This is the first time NIFC has mobilized active duty military members for fire suppression efforts since 2006.

The University of Idaho's College of Law plans to begin offering first-year law classes in Boise starting in 2017.

The Moscow-based law school began offering classes for third-year law students in Boise in 2008, and expanded to second-year students in 2012.

Dean Mark Adams told the Moscow-Pullman Daily News that he often gets asked if the college will move all operations to Boise, but that's not the case.

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A woman who killed a grizzly bear after she believed it posed a threat to her North Idaho family is worried she may be in trouble for killing a federally protected species.

The Spokesman-Review reports Barbara Casey shot the 2-year-old male grizzly Tuesday after it appeared in the backyard of her Moyie Springs home in Boundary County.

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