Frankie Barnhill

News Reporter

Frankie Barnhill is a general assignment reporter for Boise State Public Radio. Her work has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

She earned her production chops at American Public Media, where she interned for Marketplace Tech Report and American RadioWorks. Frankie was also a researcher in Minnesota Public Radio's newsroom for an investigative report on bullying.

As a freelance reporter in 2014, Frankie won a grant to profile five emerging artists for Boise State Public Radio's audience. The project, entitled "Artist Statement," was an exploration of Boise's burgeoning artistic scene.

Frankie was a fellow with the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources in 2013 and again in 2015, where she began to hone her environmental reporting skills.

Frankie graduated from the College of St. Catherine with a degree in English literature. The Missoula native spends most of her free time quoting "30 Rock" and going to concerts.

U.S. Energy Information Administration

The U.S Energy Information Administration studied the amount of carbon dioxide that was pumped into the atmosphere between 2000-2010. Idaho contributes a low amount, respectively, compared to other states. Only California, Vermont, New York and Washington D.C. have smaller carbon footprints per capita.

But Ben Otto at the Idaho Conservation League says this report doesn’t show the full picture.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

About 30-40 percent of garbage collected at the Ada County landfill in the spring and summer is yard waste. That’s according to Catherine Chertudi, Boise’s solid waste programs manger. But come July 1, that percentage could change.

RE:site + Metalab

Boise is preparing to get some new art at City Hall. A panel of city officials has selected three sculpture projects, and now it’s the public’s turn to comment. Boise residents have until May 28 to make their opinion known about the $200,000 project.

Karen Bubb is the public arts manager at the Department of Arts and History. She says one of the three sculptures will replace the fountain and flag poles in front of city hall next year.

Kevin Micalizzi / Flickr Creative Commons

The United States Geological Survey recently studied nitrate levels in streams around the country. The study found that nitrate – which can be dangerous in drinking water – can affect water systems for decades.

Although none of these study areas were in Idaho, Michael Lewis says the study is worth a closer look.

Lucas Swope

Summer is right around the corner, now that Boise's Alive After Five Concert Series has been announced.

The concerts are in their 27th year, and will once again be held every Wednesday at the downtown's Grove Center beginning June 5.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Boise dog owners will have the chance to talk with city representatives beginning today at Morris Hill Park. Boise Parks and Recreation – along with the Boise Police Department and Animal Control – will be visiting 10 off-leash areas for dogs. In the past, unleashed dogs have been a contentious issue in the city.

Idaho Statesman

The Boise Department of Arts and History recently received some good news. Harvard University’s Ash Center has selected the department as one of the most innovative government entities in the country. 

Tal Roberts / Visit Sun Valley

Ketchum is known for its recreational opportunities. Hiking, camping and river sports have long been touted as reasons for people to visit the Wood River Valley. But a distinction from a national arts organization could give the small community another claim to fame.

Butch Otter
Idaho Statesman

Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter has designated May as Second Amendment Protection Month.

His signed declaration cites Idaho's gun-friendly ranking with the National Rifle Association (NRA).

Otter's declaration also seeks to "encourage business leaders who are looking for a new operation for their locations to become new corporate citizens in a state that will encourage their continued success."

Brad Washa / Boise National Forest

Firefighters continue to battle a large blaze in southern California that started last week. At its most dangerous, the wildfire threatened about 4,000 homes and has moved quickly in the dry and windy conditions.

In Idaho, the National Interagency Fire Center predicts a slightly milder – but still above average – fire season.

Kevin Micalizzi / Flickr Creative Commons

Later today, the Natural Resources Conservation Service will release a full report on snowpack and water levels in Idaho so far this year. The report will help paint a clearer picture of a complicated water scenario.

Water specialist Ron Abramovich says this year’s snowpack started off strong, but quickly dropped off. That makes for diverse stream levels.

Molly Messick / StateImpact Idaho

It’s been five months since the mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., sparked a national gun debate. In Colorado, the state legislature there pushed through a ban on high-capacity magazines – the kind that were used to kill 12 people at a movie theater in Aurora, Co. last summer.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

A few hundred people rallied at a downtown park in Boise for immigration reform before marching to the Statehouse. As part of the national May Day rallies, Idaho labor unions, businesses and student groups came out in support of a U.S. Senate bill that would create a path to citizenship for immigrants who came to America illegally. 

Cristina McNeil is with the Idaho Community Action Network. She says that lobbying Congressman Raul Labrador to pass comprehensive immigration reform is an important part of the struggle.

DMeyer / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been two weeks since a deadly explosion at a Texas fertilizer facility claimed 14 lives and injured scores more. Investigators are still determining what caused the blast at the West Fertilizer Company.

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

This morning, ironworkers celebrated the “topping off” at the Eighth and Main Tower in downtown Boise. Business and political leaders watched as the final beam was placed at the top of the 18-story building.

Visitors to the private event signed their names before the beam was hoisted above the city’s skyline.

Speaking from the windy rooftop, developer Kem Gardner thanked construction workers who have been building the Tower.