Arts & Culture

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

The Saint Alphonsus Festival of Trees is one of the Treasure Valley’s most enduring holiday traditions. This is the 31st year of this celebration of all things Christmas. It’s open to the public from Wednesday through Sunday.

St. Al’s spokesman Josh Schlaich says 20,000 to 30,000 thousand people visit each year.

“It really is a generational thing,” Schlaich says. “We see grandparents, that have been coming for years, come with their grandchildren. We see great grandchildren. ”

Alexander Baxevanis / Flickr Creative Commons

The internationally-known author Salman Rushdie will speak in Boise Thursday evening during a free event at Boise State University. 

Rushdie’s 1988 book “The Satanic Verses” led to the leader of Iran putting a bounty on the author’s head. Iranian hardliners continue to vow to kill Rushdie.     

In April, the threat prompted police in Ohio to check for bombs in a venue where Rushdie was scheduled to speak.

The National Book Award is one of the highest honors an American writer can receive; second only perhaps to the Pulitzer Prize. This week, Boise-based author Anthony Doerr will find out if he can add National Book Award winner to his resume. Doerr’s novel “All The Light We Cannot See” is one of five finalists in fiction.

Diocese of Boise

A new leader has been named for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Boise.

Bishop Peter F. Christensen will be installed as the eighth Bishop of Boise at a Dec. 17 Mass in St John Cathedral.

He replaces Bishop Michael P. Driscoll, who submitted his letter of resignation to Pope Francis on Aug. 8 when he turned 75.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Boise in a statement Tuesday said Pope Frances announced earlier in the day that he had accepted Driscoll's resignation and named Christensen to replace him.

Christensen has been at the Diocese of Superior, Wisconsin.

HBO is planning a new six-hour miniseries on the Lewis and Clark expedition.

stonebraker
University of Idaho Library

William Allen Stonebraker worked and played in the rugged central Idaho wilderness at the turn of the 20th century and he's left behind a unique legacy of photographs to tell his story. That photo collection has just been released by the University of Idaho Library.

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

Some neighborhoods see a lot more trick-or-treaters than others Halloween night. One of the busiest Halloween hotspots is Boise’s Harrison Boulevard.

We caught up with Harrison homeowner Scott Petersen as he was painting the walkway to his front door with a rectangular sponge attached to a handle.

“At the moment we’re actually creating our yellow brick road," Petersen says. "I found this little tool at Home Depot and my girlfriend found the paint, which is washable, which is critical.”

Courtesy Futuro Media Group

It’s estimated that by 2043, white Americans will no longer be a majority of the U.S. population. But in Coeur d'Alene, Caucasians already make up a whopping 92 percent of the population. Nationally, whites total 63 percent of the population.

Coeur d'Alene has been homogeneous for the last 20 years as nearly 90 percent of new residents were white.

Canyon County Historical Society

In 1885, southwestern Idaho's Nampa was just a water tower and a few shacks, but that quickly changed when the railroad came to town. A new book by historian Larry Cain examines the railroad's impact on Nampa, and how the city has changed.

Cain says the trains, and their cargo, are a big reason why Nampa thrived in the early part of the last century.

Friends of the Bishop's House

A house that was once home to Episcopal Bishops and nurses, and was saved from demolition is celebrating its 125th year.

The Bishop’s House was built in 1889 and is one of Boise's oldest continuously-used buildings. It was remodeled 10 years later by well-known Idaho architect John Tourtellotte. He added several rooms, a three-story tower and a wrap-around porch which helped create the unique silhouette of the home.  

Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

The Idaho playwright who was awarded a MacArthur 'genius' grant this week has traveled far from his hometown of Moscow, but continues to revisit the state in much of his work.

Samuel Hunter now lives in New York, and has a play opening this weekend in Chicago.

Event Offers A Rare Glimpse Into Life For Boise Refugees

Sep 18, 2014
IRC, refugees
Jodie Martinson / Boise State Public Radio

If you've wondered what life is like for Boise refugees, a local organization has put together a unique event offering a rare chance to walk in the shoes of a new Idaho refugee.

Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Idaho native Samuel Hunter is one of 21 recipients of this year’s MacArthur Fellowship, commonly known as genius grants. Just in his early 30s, the Moscow native has already made a mark on the nation’s theater scene. He’s won numerous awards for his work including the prestigious Obie Award in 2011 for his play “A Bright New Boise.”

Francis Delapena / Treefort Music Fest

The crew at Treefort Music Fest is already in planning mode for the fourth annual extravaganza.

art.thewalters.org

A Boise State University professor is trying to solve a historical mystery.

Darryl Butt is trying to figure out who was buried in an Egyptian sarcophagus.  Butt, however, is not an archeologist or historian. He’s a materials scientist and associate director of Idaho’s Center for Advanced Energy Studies. He mostly works with nuclear fuels. Butt says his involvement started with a chance meeting with someone from the Walters Museum in Maryland.

Kris Hargis / Froelick Gallery

In a 'selfie' dominated world, a group of people are headed to the historic town of Atlanta, Idaho this weekend to immerse themselves in the art of self-portraiture. Painter Kris Hargis is leading a workshop at the Atlanta School, a new arts organization that accepts artists of all ages and levels.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

The story most people learn about the Nez Perce Tribe and the capture of Chief Joseph doesn't tell the whole history, and now the federal government and Northwest Tribes are trying to fix that with a new historic site.

You may have heard about the Nez Perce’s epic 1,200-mile flight through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming and Montana in 1877. The U.S. Army caught up with them before they could reach Canada. And in history books and documentaries, this is how the story usually ends:

Kamiah, rural, small town
Kara Oehler / Flickr Creative Commons

Idahoans are passionate about how to say the places in which they live. We learned that earlier this month with a post about the 10 places only Idahoans know how to pronounce.

You sent us dozens of suggestions, comments and explanations about Idaho's unique place names. Commentors also disagreed about the correct pronunciation of some words, which is to be expected, says Boise State University Assistant Professor of Linguistics Tim Thornes.

Courtesy Idaho State Historical Society

A new collection of vintage photographs is highlighting Idaho's historic old penitentiary which was home to bank robbers, assassins, horse thieves and moonshiners for more than 100 years. The fortress-like Old Pen has long been a staple in east Boise, and it's now a place for tourists instead of criminals.

'Slide The City' Inflates Its Giant Waterslide Aug. 30 In Boise

Aug 19, 2014
Slide the City

Utah-based Slide the City is bringing its giant waterslide to Boise Aug. 30, that's according to details on its event registration page.

We first told you about the 1,000-foot waterslide here.

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