Arts & Culture

Create Common Good

Summertime in Boise is synonymous with being outside. Before going on a hike or maybe after perusing Boise’s downtown farmer’s market this weekend, you can stop by the first Feed Your Soul Festival put on by the nonprofit Create Common Good. The free family event offers food trucks, craft beer, games and live music.

In an email interview, the group’s CEO, Tracy Hitchcock, says Create Common Good got its start in 2008 as a response to the financial crisis.

NPR

Invisibilia is back for a third season on Boise State Public Radio. Broadcast on Saturdays at 1 p.m., the NPR program uses creative storytelling to investigate human behavior.

Tom Michael spoke with the program hosts, Alix Spiegel and Hannah Rosin, who try to make science relatable. He began by asking Spiegel if she had ever interviewed anyone who seemed completely un-relatable.

Taylor Munson / Boise State Public Radio

Public libraries are providing more than books these days. The modern-day library is a gathering place featuring technology and innovation. The new library at Bown Crossing in southeast Boise is an example.

 

 

Branch supervisor, Sarah Kelley-Chase, wants it to be a community hub for exploration.

 

fiddle
Tom Michael / Boise State Public Radio

Musicians from across the country are now making their way to Washington County in western Idaho in what has become an annual summer tradition.

There’s one thing every fiddler has on their calendar, according to musician Ken Worthington: "The nationals up at Weiser, the third full week in June."

Festivities have already begun in advance of the National Oldtime Fiddlers Contest. The city has been home to an annual contest since 1953. And it became a national event 10 years later.

James Castle (1899-1977) Untitled, n.d. / Copyright 2015 James Castle Collection and Archive L.P. All rights reserved.

Boise is taking the next step in preserving the house where Idaho artist James Castle lived and worked. The city broke ground Tuesday on the next phase of construction on the site.

Castle lived in Boise’s Pierce Park neighborhood for decades, starting in the 1930s. He was born deaf and found that his art was a tool for expression and communication.

The Idaho Statesman

Idaho music icon Rosalie Sorrels passed away Sunday. Known as the “Travelin’ Lady,” she drove around the country for decades, singing folk music and recording more than 20 albums. But she always came home to Idaho.

I met Rosalie in the early 1990s when a friend asked me to help produce a CD of union folk songs. Until then, I only knew her through her songs broadcast on KBSU radio. Many people knew her through her music, which spilled out of her, night after night, as she toured the country constantly.

Idaho Shakespeare Festival

Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s production of Hamlet, its first in more than a decade, continues at its amphitheater south of Boise through the month of June. The production, directed by ISF’s artistic producing director Charlie Fee, features an Elizabethan set design and on-stage seating for the audience.

But the real talk of the town surrounds the casting of Hamlet. Alternating in the lead role are Laura Welsh Berg and Jonathan Dyrud. And when they’re not playing Hamlet, the actors are also alternating in the supporting role of Rosencrantz.

Travis Estvold

Over the weekend, Idaho filmmaking teams were given 48 hours to put together a short film for the 14th annual i48 film competition and festival.

The statewide film competition and festival is an annual event that brings together teams of filmmakers of all levels. Founder of i-48, Andrew Ellis, channeled his passion for film into creating this timed event in 2004.

 

Matthew Murphy

The Phantom of the Opera has been haunting stages across the globe for more than thirty years and is now the longest-running musical in the history of Broadway. Andrew Llloyd Webber’s classic musical returns to Boise’s Morrison Center Wednesday, June 14 and continues for an extended stay through Sunday, June 25.

The star of the current North American tour of Phantom is Derrick Davis, only the third African American actor in the musical’s history to wear the famous mask. Just prior to arriving in Boise, Davis talks with Weekend Edition host George Prentice.

Google Maps / Surel's Place

Boise’s First Thursday is a well-known event in the Treasure Valley. Focused mostly on the visual arts – with music, theater and dance playing a role as well – it’s become a staple of the downtown scene each month.

Like any adventure centering on fried food, this one starts at a posh restaurant in Boise where the head chef has twice been nominated for a James Beard Award, commonly referred to as the “Oscar of cooking.”

Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman

Apparently, Vogue is really into Idaho these days.

The formidable magazine published an online article titled “Why Boise, Idaho, Is a Growing Culinary Hotspot.” The piece, written by Jen Murphy, gives an overview of some of the well-loved local spots in the Capital City. Among them: Guru Donuts, the Basque Marketplace, Red Feather Lounge and State & Lemp.

Ted S. Warren / AP

Ernest Hemingway’s historic home in Ketchum has new ownership. The nonprofit and privately funded Community Library in Ketchum now owns Ernest Hemingway’s home along the Big Wood River.

 

 

Despite the new acquisition, Executive Director of the Community Library, Jenny Emery Davidson, intends to preserve the historical significance of Hemingway’s house.

 

Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

There’s a house in Garden City with strange noises happening inside.

Experimental electronic artist Gretchen Jude is playing around with all kinds of instruments, including the sound from a cracklebox. Jude is the artist-in-residence at Surel’s Place this month. She’s from Idaho, but has spent time in Japan and now lives in Hawaii – places that all come up in her newest piece which Jude will debut Friday night.

The Idaho Shakespeare Festival is preparing for another summer under the stars - its 41st season. This year’s repertory includes Wait Until Dark, A Midsummer’s Night Dream, a musical adaptation of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Hound of the Baskervilles and a rather unique twist on Hamlet.

Weekend Edition’s George Prentice talks with the festival’s producing artistic director Charles Fee about how he builds a season and his unique casting decision for Hamlet.

Listen to their conversation below.

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