Otto Kitsinger / AP Images

Top GOP Gubernatorial Candidates Focus On Vision In Second Debate

Idaho's top Republican governor candidates gave voters three distinct options to choose from during their second televised debate Monday on Idaho Public Television, which included plenty of jabs at each other's campaign tactics. The three candidates sparred over education, taxes, health care and social issues.

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Scott Ki

As spring turns the Boise foothills green, thousands of sheep begin their biannual grazing journey eastward.

Matt Guilhem / Boise State Public Radio

This weekend, the skies above Boise will hum with the drone a B-17 Flying Fortress. 

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

Anti-abortion rhetoric is intensifying ahead of midterm elections as a rush of officials in Republican-dominant states push legislation that would punish both doctors and patients, even though such laws are likely unconstitutional.

Hank / Flickr

A lodge at the base of Bald Mountain owned by the Sun Valley Resort is the victim of a raging fire. 

Keith Ridler / AP Images

In 1995, former Idaho Gov. Phil Batt signed an agreement with the Department of Energy, laying out deadlines to safely remove nuclear waste from the Idaho National Laboratory storage facility. The first of those deadlines is the end of this year.

Bureau of Land Management

The federal government has signed off on the final routes on public land for a 990-mile-long power line across Idaho and Wyoming.

Boise State University

The Idaho Board of Education has named five finalists to replace outgoing Boise State University President Bob Kustra -- four men and one woman are in the running for Boise State's top job.

Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho Power, dam
ArtBrom via Flickr

Idaho officials have approved an agreement allowing a utility company's $216.5 million in relicensing expenses for a three-dam hydroelectric project on the Snake River on the Idaho-Oregon border.

Courtesy of Colegio San Antonio Abad

Recovery from a powerful hurricane continues in Puerto Rico about seven months after it hit the island. In September, Hurricane Maria slammed into the U.S. territory, causing an estimated $90 billion in damage, according to federal officials.

Every weekday for more than three decades, his baritone steadied our mornings. Even in moments of chaos and crisis, Carl Kasell brought unflappable authority to the news. But behind that hid a lively sense of humor, revealed to listeners late in his career, when he became the beloved judge and official scorekeeper for Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! NPR's news quiz show.

Kasell died Tuesday from complications from Alzheimer's disease in Potomac, Md. He was 84.

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