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Boise Says Goodbye To ‘Modern Art,’ Hello To The New Deal

After nine years, a beloved arts event in downtown Boise is coming to an end. Modern Art (which takes over the Modern Hotel Thursday evening for the last time) began at the height of the Great Recession. Now, the hotel staff says it’s time to retire the event – but not without one big final party. In 2008, the Modern Hotel opened some of its rooms to local artists for one night in May. The idea was to give artists a new venue to display or perform their work, allowing them to transform their...
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Two national daily sports fantasy contests have agreed to stop offering their games to Idaho consumers. 

The Idaho Attorney General’s office announced Monday an agreement with DraftKings Inc. and FanDuel Inc. Attorney General Lawrence Wasden says the settlement was reached after three months of negotiations.

“The concern I have is that the paid daily sports offerings provided by these companies constitute gambling under Idaho law,” Wasden says in a news release.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

In an email to supporters, the Idaho Republican Party boasts that for the first time ever, more Idahoans are registered as Republicans than as Democrats or unaffiliated. The GOP says the March presidential primary recorded the highest turnout ever for a primary in the state.

This comes as no surprise to Jaclyn Kettler, political science professor at Boise State University. She says at the time of the March primary, the Republican presidential nomination was still very much up for grabs.

Idaho Education News

In terms of geography and culture, Twin Falls can scarcely be farther removed from Afghanistan or Iran, Burma or Nepal.

Yet in schools such as Twin Falls’ Lincoln Elementary School, in a portable building abutting a blacktop playground, newly arrived refugee students begin their long and stark transition to American schools.

Idaho Education News

Some refugee students at Boise’s Hillside Junior High School remember the schools in their homelands — where teachers hit their students, or where teachers feared being hit by students.

Then there are the refugee students who have spent little time in any classroom.

“You have to learn how to be a student,” said Rita Hogan, a teacher in Boise’s English Language Development program. “And that’s tough, when you’re a seventh-grader, and you’re learning algebra.”

If you think money has too great a role in Idaho politics, or worry that it could be headed that way, you have until tomorrow to give Idaho voters a chance to decide on some restrictions.

An effort by the political advocacy group Keep Idaho Elections Accountable to reform Idaho’s campaign finance laws needs 48,000 signatures by Saturday to get proposed changes on the ballot in November.

Emilie Ritter Saunders / Boise State Public Radio

An initiative to update Idaho’s laws around campaign finance has until Monday at 5 p.m. to reach the signature threshold. Former Democratic state lawmaker Holli Woodings is leading the initiative, called Keep Idaho Elections Accountable.

Woodings says that if the initiative passes muster, voters in November will have the chance to decide how Idaho deals with money in politics.

courtesy Snake River Alliance

Idaho’s first commercial solar power project won’t be operational this month as predicted. But one of the companies involved in the project says it should come online by the end of May.

The state’s first solar power farm is on about 500 acres just southwest of Boise. When the project, known as Boise City Solar, is finished it will produce enough megawatts to power 29,000 homes during good solar exposure. That’s more homes than a city the size of Idaho Falls.

Who owns it?

City of Boise

On Sunday evening, hot water poured on to the intersection of Grove and 3rd streets in downtown Boise. Steam filled the air as a leak from the city's underground geothermal line brought attention to a system not many people know much about.

Peter Morrill / Boise State Public Radio

In southeast Boise, Boise State University's Ron and Linda Yanke Family Research Park sits between the Boise River and Parkcenter Boulevard. Because of its lush green campus and proximity to the water, the building is home to many geese who choose to nest and settle in along the facility. The building is also home to Boise State Public Radio. (You may have even heard on-air geese making noise directly above our studios.)

Though goose and gosling sightings are common at the station, a particular family of geese has captured our attention.

Flickr Creative Commons

Residents of a southeast Boise neighborhood say at least 25 cats have disappeared from the area in the last few months and are concerned missing cats could be a problem throughout the city.

Cat owners tell KBOI-TV that felines started disappearing last July and then again in the last few weeks.

Erin Liedtke says five stray cats living in her garage for eight years all vanished in the last nine months.

Humane Society spokeswoman Allison Maier says predators are a big concern and a reason cats go missing.

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