courtesy Caldwell Fine Arts

Why Tibetan Monks Are In Caldwell

Eleven Tibetan Monks will be spending this week in Caldwell at the invitation of the College of Idaho and the nonprofit Caldwell Fine Arts. These monks are from a monastery in India that has a satellite campus of sorts in Georgia. The monastery’s founders fled Tibet after the Chinese government took over the area in the 1950s and its monks follow the Dalai Lama. The monks will spend much of the week creating an intricate sand picture called a mandala. Caldwell Fine Arts director Alison...
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Frankie Barnhill / Boise State Public Radio

Earlier in this series, we told you about the importance of ground water in Idaho. The state relies on underground aquifers and private wells to quench the thirst of 90-95 percent of the population.

Idaho Statesman

The two Idaho Supreme Court candidates hoping to replace Chief Justice Jim Jones both say they support promoting pro bono work across the state.

Pro bono refers to work done by attorneys on a volunteer basis for free or reduced rates.

However, neither Twin Falls attorney Robyn Brody nor state GOP Sen. Curt McKenzie say they track how many hours of pro bono work they provide. Both candidates say they believe they clock more than the suggested 50 hours of free or reduced-fee legal services each year.

The Idaho Land Board voted Tuesday to put 9 state-owned commercial properties worth about $20 million up for auction, likely in early December.

The unanimous vote by the five-member board is part of the board's new strategic reinvestment plan that calls for using money from the sale of commercial real estate and residential cottage sites to buy timberland and agricultural land.

Boise City Department of Arts and History

The City of Boise has allotted its largest amount ever to local artists through its annual grant program. The arts and history department announced Monday the 33 arts organizations and individuals will receive a total of $200,000.

The annual grant fund comes from the city’s general fund and has grown rapidly over the last few years. Since the grant program began 20 years ago, the city has awarded more than $1 million to artists and art groups. 

Adam Cotterell / Boise State Public Radio

When I turn on a sink I often wonder where the water is coming from. It turns out when I’m getting a drink in our newsroom kitchenette in east Boise I can see the answer through the window. It’s the Boise River. If I could go up the faucet and through the pipes I’d come out less than a mile upstream at the Marden water treatment plant off of Warm Springs Blvd.

Mark Snider with Suez, the multi-national company that supplies drinking water to most of Boise and some of Eagle says this was their first surface water treatment plant in Boise.

Idaho Ed News

The State Board of Education wants to crack down on bad teacher evaluation data.

Specifically, the board is looking at imposing fines against school superintendents who deliberately send false data to the state.

The board gave the idea its preliminary approval Monday morning — during a  meeting that was held via conference call. Reporters received word of the meeting only a few hours ahead of time.

Board members endorsed adding language on teacher evaluation data to the career ladder law — the state’s five-year plan to boost teacher salaries.

Colleen Back / Idaho Aviation Foundation

The reopening of an iconic backcountry lodge has been pushed to next summer. As KBSX reported last year, the rebuilding of Big Creek Lodge near the Frank Church Wilderness is led by a group of hobby pilots who use the airstrip in the same location. 

Colleen Back of the Idaho Aviation Foundation can’t help but use flying analogies when she talks about the progress and setbacks with the Big Creek Lodge this year.

Boise Parks and Recreation

Friday, Boise opened the last section of the Boise Greenbelt. It comes nearly fifty years after the city started gathering up land to create the iconic foot-and-bike-path.

The new .9-mile section is on the south side of the Boise River between Americana Boulevard and Garden City. With this section, Boise says the Greenbelt is complete within city limits. The footpath stretches nearly 26 miles along both sides of the river.

Idaho Department of Water Resources

It’s no secret that Eastern Idaho has a water problem. There is too much demand and too little water in the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer to go around. But how did we get to this point? That’s what this chart is all about.

About 100 years ago, there was roughly 4,000 cubic feet per second of water coming out of the aquifer at Thousand Springs. It’s important to note that’s not how much water was in the aquifer, just how much was flowing out.

Samantha Wright / Boise State Public Radio

It’s 60 miles across, mostly hidden from view and vital to the economy of Idaho. Much of the time, the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer gets little attention, even from people who rely on it every day. Without it, farmland would disappear and cities from Twin Falls to Rexburg would dry up. As we begin our series on water in Idaho, we take a closer look at the state’s largest “body” of water, hidden underneath the Snake River Plain.

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